State Properties

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Isabella Sanzi 2E
Posts: 54
Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2017 3:00 am

State Properties

Postby Isabella Sanzi 2E » Wed Feb 14, 2018 10:11 am

Just for clarification, what is the difference between specific heat capacity and heat capacity and is either a state property? Thanks!

Michelle Chernyak 1J
Posts: 33
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:06 am

Re: State Properties

Postby Michelle Chernyak 1J » Wed Feb 14, 2018 10:15 am

Specific heat capacity is the amount of energy it requires to raise 1 g of a substance by 1 degree of temperature while heat capacity is the amount of energy it requires to raise the given amount 1 degree of temperature. Specific heat is an intensive property, meaning that regardless of the amount present, it will always require the SAME energy to raise ONE gram of the substance. Contrary, heat capacity is extensive meaning that if there is more mass of the substance present, than the heat capacity will be greater.

Maeve Gallagher 1J
Posts: 56
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am

Re: State Properties

Postby Maeve Gallagher 1J » Wed Feb 14, 2018 10:15 am

Heat capacity is the energy required to raise the temperature of a substance by 1 degree C, and it is an extensive property. Specific heat capacity is the energy required to raise one gram of substance by 1 degree C, and is an intensive property. The difference lies in that one in extensive and one is intensive, meaning that heat capacity is dependent on the amount of substance you have, while specific heat capacity is not. Both values are constants, so they are not state properties.

RohanGupta1G
Posts: 34
Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:00 am

Re: State Properties

Postby RohanGupta1G » Wed Feb 14, 2018 10:38 am

heat capacity is q=c(delta t)
specific heat capacity is q=mc(delta t)
basically specific heat capacity is specific to your sample because it incorporates mass.

804899546
Posts: 51
Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:00 am

Re: State Properties

Postby 804899546 » Fri Mar 16, 2018 10:32 pm

RohanGupta1G wrote:heat capacity is q=c(delta t)
specific heat capacity is q=mc(delta t)
basically specific heat capacity is specific to your sample because it incorporates mass.

To clarify, these are the equations you would use to find q using heat capacity or specific heat capacity. The actual heat capacity and specific heat capacity values are "c" in their respective equations. The reason you include mass in the second is because we need to multiply the amount of heat it takes to heat one gram by the amount of grams we have, whereas in the first equation it has already done this for us.

804899546
Posts: 51
Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:00 am

Re: State Properties

Postby 804899546 » Fri Mar 16, 2018 10:34 pm

Maeve Gallagher 1J wrote:Heat capacity is the energy required to raise the temperature of a substance by 1 degree C, and it is an extensive property. Specific heat capacity is the energy required to raise one gram of substance by 1 degree C, and is an intensive property. The difference lies in that one in extensive and one is intensive, meaning that heat capacity is dependent on the amount of substance you have, while specific heat capacity is not. Both values are constants, so they are not state properties.

Can you clarify what you mean by both values are constants and therefore cannot be state properties?


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