Reversible rxn

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sarahtang4B
Posts: 132
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Reversible rxn

Postby sarahtang4B » Sat Feb 02, 2019 2:21 pm

How does a reversible reaction do more work?

taline_n
Posts: 64
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:17 am

Re: Reversible rxn

Postby taline_n » Sat Feb 02, 2019 2:34 pm

A reversible process is one that is infinitely slow because it is at equilibrium (any slight change to the reaction can cause a shift, which is why it's called reversible). If the system is doing work on the surroundings, more work is done if the process goes by slowly (because then, less heat is lost to the surroundings). Therefore, a reversible process (infinitely slow) does the maximum work.

Katelyn Pham 4E
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:21 am

Re: Reversible rxn

Postby Katelyn Pham 4E » Sat Feb 02, 2019 4:03 pm

A reversible process is one that can be reversed by an "infinitesimal" change in a variable.

Alyssa Wilson 2A
Posts: 65
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: Reversible rxn

Postby Alyssa Wilson 2A » Sat Feb 02, 2019 4:06 pm

The higher the temperature, the higher the gas pressure will be, so the expansion takes place against a stronger opposing force and therefore must do more work. So therefore, the reversible reaction will be doing more work compared to the others.

MackenziePerillo-1L
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:19 am

Re: Reversible rxn

Postby MackenziePerillo-1L » Sat Feb 02, 2019 4:10 pm

Will the reverse reaction always be doing more work than the forward reaction?

Milena Aragon 2B
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:19 am

Re: Reversible rxn

Postby Milena Aragon 2B » Sun Feb 03, 2019 3:19 pm

MackenziePerillo-1L wrote:Will the reverse reaction always be doing more work than the forward reaction?


I think that what they are discussing is a reversible reaction (where the system isn't at equilibrium and the change will be definite) as opposed to an irreversible reaction (where the system is at equilibrium and changes occur in infinitely small steps) instead of a forward and reverse reaction. The reversible reaction will always do more work than the irreversible reaction.


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