Heat Supplied to a system

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005321227
Posts: 90
Joined: Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:15 am

Heat Supplied to a system

Postby 005321227 » Tue Jan 28, 2020 3:10 am

(a) Calculate the heat that must be supplied to a copper kettle of mass 400.0 g containing 300.0 g of water to raise its tem- perature from 20.0 8C to the boiling point of water, 100.0 8C. (b) What percentage of the heat is used to raise the temperature of the water?

I am slightly confused on how to go about the problem; what does the copper kettle and its mass have to do with the problem? is this a composite section?

McKenna_4A
Posts: 115
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Heat Supplied to a system

Postby McKenna_4A » Tue Jan 28, 2020 9:00 am

Simply use q=g(Csp)T for both copper and water and add the two values together. This will give you total heat.

005384106
Posts: 101
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Heat Supplied to a system

Postby 005384106 » Tue Jan 28, 2020 9:32 pm

Are Cs and Cm both constants? Can I chose to use Kelvin or Celcius or do I need to use a certain unit unit of measurement in the measurement for specific head of the heat equation.

Eunice Nguyen 4I
Posts: 100
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Heat Supplied to a system

Postby Eunice Nguyen 4I » Tue Jan 28, 2020 9:49 pm

005384106 wrote:Are Cs and Cm both constants? Can I chose to use Kelvin or Celcius or do I need to use a certain unit unit of measurement in the measurement for specific head of the heat equation.

Lavelle mentioned in class that we should be choosing Kelvin for the most part whenever we're calculating. However, make sure that your end result is in the unit that is given in the problem.

Elizabeth Harty 1A
Posts: 125
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Heat Supplied to a system

Postby Elizabeth Harty 1A » Tue Jan 28, 2020 10:19 pm

Why do you include the mass of the copper, I thought you only used the mass of the water?

Minh Ngo 4G
Posts: 137
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Heat Supplied to a system

Postby Minh Ngo 4G » Tue Jan 28, 2020 11:35 pm

You need the mass to use q=mc(delta)T

Anthony Hatashita 4H
Posts: 103
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:21 am

Re: Heat Supplied to a system

Postby Anthony Hatashita 4H » Thu Jan 30, 2020 8:06 pm

Think of this problem as having two parts: first you heat up the copper, then the water. You add up the change in energy for both of them to find the total.


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