Open Beaker  [ENDORSED]

isochoric/isometric:
isothermal:
isobaric:

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

Janice Xiao 1I
Posts: 52
Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2017 3:00 am

Open Beaker

Postby Janice Xiao 1I » Sat Jan 20, 2018 10:02 pm

If a reaction occurs in an open beaker, does that mean it's at constant pressure?

Sungyoon_Baek_1A
Posts: 32
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:06 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Open Beaker

Postby Sungyoon_Baek_1A » Sat Jan 20, 2018 10:10 pm

yes. since the open beaker is exposed to the open atmosphere and the atmosphere is very very large in comparison to the small beaker, the pressure is constant.

Matthew 1C
Posts: 47
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:06 am

Re: Open Beaker

Postby Matthew 1C » Sat Jan 20, 2018 10:10 pm

Yes because it can equilibriate with the pressure of the surroundings

Vivian Nguyen
Posts: 66
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am
Been upvoted: 2 times

Re: Open Beaker

Postby Vivian Nguyen » Sat Jan 20, 2018 10:16 pm

Yes^, I believe so because the surroundings in an open beaker are so large that the pressure is constant /unchanging. I might be wrong, but I think this is when Dr.Lavelle used the examples about whether the temperature of the surroundings would be affected by an individual lighting a match. The pressure of an open system would not change either.

Andrea ORiordan 1L
Posts: 52
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am
Been upvoted: 2 times

Re: Open Beaker  [ENDORSED]

Postby Andrea ORiordan 1L » Mon Jan 22, 2018 12:24 pm

All of the above are correct-- one more example I found helpful with regard to the difference between system and surroundings was the ocean analogy. If you add a bucketful of water to the ocean, it doesn't really change the volume or pressure.

Amelia Georgius 1K
Posts: 25
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:05 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Open Beaker

Postby Amelia Georgius 1K » Mon Jan 22, 2018 9:04 pm

Because the system is open it can therefore remain at a constant pressure with its surroundings because it can exchange both energy and matter to come to an equilibrium pressure state.


Return to “Thermodynamic Definitions (isochoric/isometric, isothermal, isobaric)”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest