Extensive vs Intensive

isochoric/isometric:
isothermal:
isobaric:

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Joanna Pham - 2D
Posts: 113
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:04 am

Extensive vs Intensive

Postby Joanna Pham - 2D » Tue Feb 12, 2019 9:11 am

Can someone please explain what an extensive and intensive property is?

Sara Flynn 2C
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

Re: Extensive vs Intensive

Postby Sara Flynn 2C » Tue Feb 12, 2019 9:14 am

an intensive property is something that is true no matter how much mass there is of a substance while an extensive property depends on how much product is present

Patrick Cai 1L
Posts: 93
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: Extensive vs Intensive

Postby Patrick Cai 1L » Tue Feb 12, 2019 10:21 am

Some examples of intensive and extensive properties include density, which is a value independent of how much material you have, and mass, which is scales with the more substance you have, respectively.

Karishma_1G
Posts: 67
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: Extensive vs Intensive

Postby Karishma_1G » Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:52 am

Like stated below, an extensive property is one that depends on the amount of matter present. Volume, mass and length are all examples of extensive properties. Intensive properties, on the other hand, are those that do no matter on the amount of matter present. Examples include density.

Kessandra Ng 1K
Posts: 67
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: Extensive vs Intensive

Postby Kessandra Ng 1K » Tue Feb 12, 2019 12:10 pm

In Lyndon's review session, he also pointed out that while heat capacity is an extensive property, specific heat capacity and molar heat capacity are both intensive properties.

Cody Do 2F
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

Re: Extensive vs Intensive

Postby Cody Do 2F » Tue Feb 12, 2019 12:38 pm

During one of Lavelle's lectures, he mentioned that intensive properties are more useful in the field of science due to the fact that they are properties intrinsic to the material (they don't depend on the amount).


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