Reversible v irreversible

isochoric/isometric:
isothermal:
isobaric:

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Katherine Grillo 1B
Posts: 69
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Reversible v irreversible

Postby Katherine Grillo 1B » Tue Feb 12, 2019 9:24 pm

What does it mean when an expansion is isothermal/reversible? What would be an example of an irreversible expansion?

Becky Belisle 1A
Posts: 81
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: Reversible v irreversible

Postby Becky Belisle 1A » Tue Feb 12, 2019 9:51 pm

If an expansion is isothermal, the change in temperature equals zero. If an expansion is reversible, w= -nRTln(V2/V1). For irreversible expansions, pressure is treated as constant. So, w= -PexΔV.

Madeline Motamedi 4I
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

Re: Reversible v irreversible

Postby Madeline Motamedi 4I » Sun Feb 17, 2019 3:36 pm

Like the example during class, Prof. Lavelle told us if we were to have a system being held with a lid and the pressure of the system is 2 atm while the surroundings are 1 atm if we were to release the lid, it would shoot upwards. That is an example of an irreversible system.

Saman Andalib 1H
Posts: 73
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:16 am

Re: Reversible v irreversible

Postby Saman Andalib 1H » Sun Feb 17, 2019 4:10 pm

It means that temperature is maintained constant and that there is an infinitesimally small pressure difference, resulting in us having to use the integral to solve.

anthony_trieu2L
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:29 am

Re: Reversible v irreversible

Postby anthony_trieu2L » Sun Feb 17, 2019 4:41 pm

To add, reversible reactions always result in more work because of the infinitesimally pressure differences.


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