Isothermal and Reversible

isochoric/isometric:
isothermal:
isobaric:

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

VLi_2B
Posts: 99
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:15 am

Isothermal and Reversible

Postby VLi_2B » Sun Feb 09, 2020 8:37 pm

When a process is reversible, is it also isothermal?

EthanPham_1G
Posts: 104
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Isothermal and Reversible

Postby EthanPham_1G » Sun Feb 09, 2020 8:37 pm

Yes. Isothermal is another way to say reversible.

Kate Osborne 1H
Posts: 102
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Isothermal and Reversible

Postby Kate Osborne 1H » Sun Feb 09, 2020 8:39 pm

isothermal means that the reaction takes place at a constant temperature and if a reaction takes place at a constant temperature it is reversible, as such they mean the same thing

PranaviKolla2B
Posts: 114
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Isothermal and Reversible

Postby PranaviKolla2B » Sun Feb 09, 2020 8:40 pm

What exactly does it mean for a process to be reversible?

J Medina 2I
Posts: 102
Joined: Wed Sep 25, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Isothermal and Reversible

Postby J Medina 2I » Sun Feb 09, 2020 8:41 pm

So does irreversible just refer to anything that is not at constant temperature, or is there a more specific definition?

Hussain Chharawalla 1G
Posts: 100
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Isothermal and Reversible

Postby Hussain Chharawalla 1G » Sun Feb 09, 2020 8:49 pm

If a process is reversible then you can think of it as being done in infinetely small increments. Because of this the system remains in equilibrium with its surroundings and work can be calculated using the integral formula. If it is irreversible, the change is rapid and the system cannot be in equilibrium and the work is w=-pdeltaV.

SarahCoufal_1k
Posts: 102
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Isothermal and Reversible

Postby SarahCoufal_1k » Sun Feb 09, 2020 8:51 pm

PranaviKolla2B wrote:What exactly does it mean for a process to be reversible?


In the review session today, they said something is reversible when ΔS total=0 and since
ΔS total= ΔS system + ΔS surroundings then
ΔS system = -Δ S surroundings

The textbook also defines a reversible process as a process that can be reversed by an infinitely small change in a variable. for example if the external pressure matches the internal pressure of a gas in the system the piston does not move. But if the external pressure is increased by a infinitely small change, then the piston moves in.


Return to “Thermodynamic Definitions (isochoric/isometric, isothermal, isobaric)”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests