Finding the Limiting Reactant

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Victoria Luu - 1C
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:15 am

Finding the Limiting Reactant

Postby Victoria Luu - 1C » Wed Oct 03, 2018 5:01 pm

If there is no excess in product, which means there is no limiting reactant, which reactant would you use to find the mass of the product? Are they interchangable because they have the same amount of mols? What if the mol to mol ratio is different?

Mahir_Hasan2C
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: Finding the Limiting Reactant

Postby Mahir_Hasan2C » Wed Oct 03, 2018 5:07 pm

Normally there would be a limiting reactant. However, if there was the case you just described, it would be interchangeable since it none of the reactants would limit each other.

Reva Kakaria 1J
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am
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Re: Finding the Limiting Reactant

Postby Reva Kakaria 1J » Wed Oct 03, 2018 5:08 pm

If there is no excess of either reactant, that means that all reactants are present in exactly the right molar ratio. This means calculating the moles of product with any reactant would give you the same answer. This works even if they don't have the same number of moles; as long as the ratio is right, I think you can use either reactant to calculate the product.

For example, in the reaction 2H2 + O2 --> 2H2O, the molar ratio of the reactants is 2:1. If you have two moles of H2 and one mole of O2, there is no limiting reactant since they're present in the exact ratio needed to produce 2H2O.

I hope this helps!


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