chemical formula regarding M.9

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Noh_Jasmine_1J
Posts: 71
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:15 am

chemical formula regarding M.9

Postby Noh_Jasmine_1J » Thu Oct 04, 2018 12:58 pm

hi, I just had a question for M.9, which asks for us to write the net ionic equation for the reaction: copper(II) nitrate reacts with sodium hydroxide to produce a precipitate of light blue copper(II) hydroxide. what do the Roman numerals mean and how does NaNO3 appear on the products side out of nowhere?

aisteles1G
Posts: 117
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:15 am

Re: chemical formula regarding M.9

Postby aisteles1G » Thu Oct 04, 2018 1:25 pm

The roman numerals stand for the charge on the atom, so copper (ll) Nitrate means that the copper has to have a +2 charge so the net charge would be zero on the molecule. Cu(NO3)2 would be written out Copper (ll) Nitrate. The rule is that for cations that can have multiple charges, you use roman numerals after the first element in parenthesis.

Krisdylle Repollo 4H
Posts: 33
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: chemical formula regarding M.9

Postby Krisdylle Repollo 4H » Thu Oct 04, 2018 1:30 pm

The roman numerals in Copper (II) just indicate the charge of the metal. Another way to see it is CU2+. We use roman numerals because some metals have more than one ion. In the case of copper, there are two; copper (I) (cuprous) and copper (II) (cupric).


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