multiple limiting reactants

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

Aiden Atoori 1C
Posts: 67
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:24 am

multiple limiting reactants

Postby Aiden Atoori 1C » Thu Oct 04, 2018 6:19 pm

Can a reaction have more than one limiting reactant and why or why not? I feel like if the reactants are in the same phsyical state than it is possible. If someone can clairfy, that would be gretaly appreciated.

melodyzaki2E
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: multiple limiting reactants

Postby melodyzaki2E » Thu Oct 04, 2018 6:29 pm

I think it can have more than one limiting reactant but the mole ratio has to be the same between them and the quantities used have to have to match that mole ratio, so that both are used up simultaneously. But i'm pretty sure that this is a very hypothetical situation and is not seen in chemical reactions often, if ever. I could be wrong though.

005199302
Posts: 108
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:15 am

Re: multiple limiting reactants

Postby 005199302 » Thu Oct 04, 2018 6:54 pm

I believe that it's not possible because thinking logically, if there were two limiting reactants, they would have the exact same molar ratio. If this were true, then neither reactant would limit the other - they would both be completely consumed in the reaction.

Faith Fredlund 1H
Posts: 68
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: multiple limiting reactants

Postby Faith Fredlund 1H » Thu Oct 04, 2018 9:21 pm

Technically, a limiting reactant is the reactant that is completely consumed during the reaction. If there are three reactants and two of the three are totally consumed, it would make sense for them both to be limiting reactants, while the third is i n excess. I could be wrong, but that is my interpretation of the information.

Chem_Mod
Posts: 18400
Joined: Thu Aug 04, 2011 1:53 pm
Has upvoted: 435 times

Re: multiple limiting reactants

Postby Chem_Mod » Thu Oct 04, 2018 11:27 pm

Theoretically, if there are exact moles of each reactant and they are both consumed exactly, there are 2 limiting reactants (or you can also say there are no limiting reactants). However, this is almost impossible to achieve, so there is almost always a limiting reactant. In problems and tests it will be clear that we want you to find the limiting reactant.

Shivangi_2J
Posts: 65
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:15 am

Re: multiple limiting reactants

Postby Shivangi_2J » Fri Oct 05, 2018 1:32 am

I remember coming across this in the online module and the answer given as correct was: no, it is highly unlikely that 2 reactants are both present in limiting molar amounts.

Lauren Huang 1H
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:16 am

Re: multiple limiting reactants

Postby Lauren Huang 1H » Fri Oct 05, 2018 1:35 am

Yea, when I took the online module that had this question, the correct answer was no (there cannot be more than one limiting reactant). This makes sense because if there were two reactants with the same mole ratio, then neither one would limit the other since they were both consumed completely in the reaction.

Arshia Ramesh 1G
Posts: 35
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: multiple limiting reactants

Postby Arshia Ramesh 1G » Fri Oct 05, 2018 2:41 am

I don't think that there can be two limiting reactants especially if there are only two products.

Sona Hakobyan 3J
Posts: 45
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: multiple limiting reactants

Postby Sona Hakobyan 3J » Fri Oct 05, 2018 3:23 am

This would not be likely because if there were two reactants with the same mole ratio and are consumed the exact same, then there could be no limiting reactant.

Hannah Padilla 1H
Posts: 29
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:19 am

Re: multiple limiting reactants

Postby Hannah Padilla 1H » Fri Oct 05, 2018 7:06 am

It is highly unlikely there will be two limiting reactants


Return to “Limiting Reactant Calculations”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests