Limiting Reagent

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Rebecca Altshuler 1D
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:15 am

Limiting Reagent

Postby Rebecca Altshuler 1D » Thu Oct 11, 2018 12:10 pm

If you were given a limiting reagent question with three reagents, how would you solve it? Would you see which one was limiting between two of the reagents, and then check if the third reagent was more limiting than the first limiting reagent?

Kevin ODonnell 2B
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:24 am

Re: Limiting Reagent

Postby Kevin ODonnell 2B » Thu Oct 11, 2018 12:18 pm

Example #6 on this website does a great job of explaining it with a practice problem:
https://www.chemteam.info/Stoichiometry ... agent.html

Marwan Masri 3B
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

Re: Limiting Reagent

Postby Marwan Masri 3B » Thu Oct 11, 2018 12:18 pm

Alternatively, you can calculate how much of the product would each reactant produce; the reactant that produces the least moles of product would be the limiting reactant.

Stephen Sirmay 1I
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Re: Limiting Reagent

Postby Stephen Sirmay 1I » Thu Oct 11, 2018 12:23 pm

After calculating the moles of each reactant, use the lowest number of moles to help find the limiting reagent. Alternatively, use a molar ratio from the balanced chemical equation to determine how much of each product is needed to use up the others, the reactant without enough moles to use up the others is the limiting reactant.

Xingzheng Sun 2K
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:29 am

Re: Limiting Reagent

Postby Xingzheng Sun 2K » Fri Oct 12, 2018 4:14 am

I would say you do the three reagents together. Find the moles of each one first and figure out which one is the smallest. That is the limiting reagent.

sarahartzell1k
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:17 am

Re: Limiting Reagent

Postby sarahartzell1k » Fri Oct 12, 2018 8:21 am

personally, I would use the amount of each reagant to calculate the amount of moles you have then use the molar ratio to determine how many moles of each substance you need to find the limiting reactant that way.

Kyither Min 2K
Posts: 60
Joined: Wed Oct 03, 2018 12:15 am

Re: Limiting Reagent

Postby Kyither Min 2K » Fri Oct 12, 2018 3:16 pm

I think the best way to figure out limiting reagent for any amount of reagents is figuring out the amount of moles of each reagent. Then, using the coefficients of the balanced equation, figure out how many moles of the product each reagent will get you if the rest of the reagents were in excess. Finally, the reagent that will produce the least amount of product is the limiting reagent.

jane_ni_2d
Posts: 67
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

Re: Limiting Reagent

Postby jane_ni_2d » Sat Oct 13, 2018 12:46 pm

There is no difference between there being two limiting reagants and just one. You still find the mole ratio and the reagant with the smallest mole ratio is the limiting reagant.

Isabelle_Maletz_3E
Posts: 27
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:03 am

Re: Limiting Reagent

Postby Isabelle_Maletz_3E » Sun Oct 21, 2018 1:05 am

You would have to still get the moles of each reactant then calculate the mole ratios. Then you would compare that mole ratio to the one in the balanced chemical equation and find the limiting reactant from there.

Tyler Vu 4I
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Re: Limiting Reagent

Postby Tyler Vu 4I » Mon Oct 29, 2018 11:23 pm

You can still calculate the amount of product that each reagent produces and then the lowest one or ones would be the limiting reagent.

daniela3D
Posts: 19
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: Limiting Reagent

Postby daniela3D » Tue Oct 30, 2018 12:04 am

I don't think that's how it works. You need to find the weight of each reactant separately and compare which one weighs less. The one that weighs less is your limiting reactant.


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