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Entropy and Temperature

Posted: Wed Jan 31, 2018 3:06 pm
by Angela 1K
I understand that, according to , temperature and entropy are inversely related. So, an increase in temperature would result in a decrease in entropy. But I don't understand that because, how I see it, and increase in temperature results in an increase in the speed of the molecules, which results in an increase in entropy. And that goes against what the equation says. If anyone could please clarify my misconception, I'd appreciate it.

Re: Entropy and Temperature

Posted: Wed Jan 31, 2018 3:35 pm
by Sabrina Dunbar 1I
The term ∆S means the change in entropy, not just entropy itself. By increasing the temperature, the change in entropy is less than if the reaction were to occur at a lower temperature. The larger T value in the denominator makes this ∆S value less because as you said, the two are inversely related. Hopefully this clarifies enough of your questions:)

Re: Entropy and Temperature

Posted: Wed Jan 31, 2018 6:17 pm
by Eli Aminpour 2K
Also, we used this equation in class to find the change in entropy when temperature is constant (as ice melts for example). If you want to find the change in entropy when temperature is not constant, use the equation delta S=n*C*ln(t2/t1)

Re: Entropy and Temperature

Posted: Wed Jan 31, 2018 7:12 pm
by Adrian Lim 1G
What would the c value be in delta S=n*C*ln(t2/t1)?