9.13


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Ammarah 2H
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:06 am

9.13

Postby Ammarah 2H » Wed Jan 31, 2018 5:15 pm

For #13 on the homework, why isn't the C value used instead of R in the calculation for the temperature? (I was looking at the example and they used C, not R).

Cassidy 1G
Posts: 54
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am

Re: 9.13

Postby Cassidy 1G » Wed Jan 31, 2018 5:21 pm

There was a correction made to the solution manual for this problem on the class website. In the correct solution Cv=5/2 R is used.

Swetha Sundaram 1E
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Re: 9.13

Postby Swetha Sundaram 1E » Wed Jan 31, 2018 6:13 pm

Correct me if I'm wrong, but 3/2R represents a monatomic gas, 5/2R represents a diatomic gas, and 7/2R represents a polyatomic gas?

ConnorThomas2E
Posts: 57
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am

Re: 9.13

Postby ConnorThomas2E » Wed Jan 31, 2018 6:29 pm

For ideal gases, it is 5/2R at constant volume and 3/2R at constant pressure

Ammarah 2H
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:06 am

Re: 9.13

Postby Ammarah 2H » Wed Jan 31, 2018 6:29 pm

I believe that the values of C are based off whether the atom is at constant pressure or volume. I think the 7/2 R is for a linear molecule at constant pressure, 3/2 R is for an atom at constant volume, and 5/2 R is for an atom at constant pressure.

Jana Sun 1I
Posts: 52
Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:00 am

Re: 9.13

Postby Jana Sun 1I » Thu Feb 01, 2018 10:35 am

Is there a specific homework problem that uses 7/2R? I'm just a little surprised because I haven't seen it before and I'm not sure when I would know to use it.


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