9.25 Avogadro's Number?

Boltzmann Equation for Entropy:

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Michelle Dong 1F
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9.25 Avogadro's Number?

Postby Michelle Dong 1F » Thu Feb 01, 2018 11:09 am

If SO2F2 adopts a positionally disordered arrangement in its crystal form, what might its residual molar entropy be?

Why do we raise the number of microstates to Avogadro's number? How do we know it's talking about one mole of SO2F2? Why isn't it just raised to the power of 1 because it's one molecule of SO2F2?

Sarah_Stay_1D
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Re: 9.25 Avogadro's Number?

Postby Sarah_Stay_1D » Thu Feb 01, 2018 11:27 am

Michelle Dong 1F wrote:If SO2F2 adopts a positionally disordered arrangement in its crystal form, what might its residual molar entropy be?

Why do we raise the number of microstates to Avogadro's number? How do we know it's talking about one mole of SO2F2? Why isn't it just raised to the power of 1 because it's one molecule of SO2F2?


In this case it does not specifically state that is is one molecule of SO2F2. Also since it is asking for the residual *molar* entropy, we know we should use Avogadro's number.

For instance, if the problem said, find the residual entropy for 1 molecule of SO2F2, you would only raise it to the first power.

Rohan Chaudhari- 1K
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Re: 9.25 Avogadro's Number?

Postby Rohan Chaudhari- 1K » Sun Feb 04, 2018 12:13 am

Its residual molar entropy, therefore SO2F2 must be a mole.


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