calculating specific heat

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RenuChepuru1L
Posts: 58
Joined: Thu Jul 27, 2017 3:00 am

calculating specific heat

Postby RenuChepuru1L » Wed Jan 17, 2018 3:26 pm

so does volume not matter when calculating specific heat? for questions involving q and qcal they keep giving me the liters of whatever molecule but I never end up using it in the calculations

Clara Hu 1G
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Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:00 am
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Re: calculating specific heat

Postby Clara Hu 1G » Wed Jan 17, 2018 4:09 pm

When using specific heat capacity to get q, only the mass and change in temperature are needed because the equation is q=mCT. The units for q is in joules and specific heat is in J/g°C, so when you multiply the specific heat by the mass (g) and change in temperature, (°C), you are left with joules, which are the units you need for q.

Anna Li 2E
Posts: 21
Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:00 am

Re: calculating specific heat

Postby Anna Li 2E » Sun Jan 21, 2018 10:11 pm

The equation for specific heat is Specific Heat Capacity= (n x ∆T)/q. Through this equation we can see that the heat capacity is determined by mols (n) and not volume. However, (although I don't know the specific question you are referencing) problems will sometimes give you volume(Liters) and pressure (Atmosphere) and expect you to calculate heat using the conversion 1 L x atm = 101.325 Joules.

Jacob Cho 2L
Posts: 12
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:05 am

Re: calculating specific heat

Postby Jacob Cho 2L » Sun Jan 21, 2018 10:21 pm

For specific heat capacity, volume is not necessary unless you need it to find mass. For example, you would need volume to find mass if you are given density and volume or molarity, volume, and molar mass.

Jennifer Ho 1K
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Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2017 3:00 am

Re: calculating specific heat

Postby Jennifer Ho 1K » Tue Jan 23, 2018 10:44 pm

Volume is not necessary in calculating specific heat because the energy absorbed or released only depends on the mass of the material, how much of that material is present. The density of the material should stay constant anyways, so the greater volume you have of it, the more mass you will have, making including both unnecessary. In calculations volume will probably only be used if you're not given mass and you're given something you can use to convert the volume to mass, like density or molarity.

Leanne Wong 1H
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Re: calculating specific heat

Postby Leanne Wong 1H » Mon Jan 29, 2018 8:45 pm

Volume would not be necessary because specific heat capacity is in the units of Joules per grams and Celsius or Kelvin.


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