11.111  [ENDORSED]






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ZoeHahn1J
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11.111

Postby ZoeHahn1J » Wed Feb 14, 2018 2:48 am

When doing 11.111, I used dG of rxn 1 to find K of reaction one, multiplied K by 10 to get K of rxn 2, and then used that to find dG of reaction 2 (this gave the incorrect answer). However, I'm not sure of how to solve this even looking at the solutions manual; why would we add the two delta G values together in e^(deltaG1 + deltaG2 /RT) then solve for dG?
I hope this is clear! Thank you so much!

Jessica Lutz 2E
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Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am

Re: 11.111

Postby Jessica Lutz 2E » Wed Feb 14, 2018 9:36 am

I thought about it the same way that you did but, because the first reaction is ten times the second reaction, you would actually divide (not multiply) the first K value by ten to find the second K value. Then you can solve for dG and you should get the right answer.

ZoeHahn1J
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Re: 11.111

Postby ZoeHahn1J » Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:13 pm

Oh! Thank you so much!

Nhan Nguyen 2F
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Re: 11.111  [ENDORSED]

Postby Nhan Nguyen 2F » Sat Mar 10, 2018 6:32 pm

It's actually 10= e^-(deltaG1)/RT divided by e^- (deltaG2 /RT) because 10=k1/k2
When e^x/ e^y, it becomes e^(x-y)

so then it's e^(-deltaG1 + deltaG2 /RT)


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