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How to interpret reversible/irreversible graphs

Posted: Sun Feb 16, 2020 7:45 pm
by Andrew F 2L
For Gibbs free energy, what I understand is that when the value of Delta G is below 0, the reaction is reversible. How do I interpret the graph of the reversible reaction from there? Why is temperature constant along the pathway according to Dr Lavelle? Thank you

Re: How to interpret reversible/irreversible graphs

Posted: Sun Feb 16, 2020 8:06 pm
by Kate Osborne 1H
I think the temperature is constant because most reactions occur at a constant external temperature and pressure

Re: How to interpret reversible/irreversible graphs

Posted: Sun Feb 16, 2020 8:49 pm
by Madelyn Romberg 1H
For a reversible reaction, it occurs under constant temperature because it is such a slow and small change that it remains balanced between the internal and external environment.

Re: How to interpret reversible/irreversible graphs

Posted: Sun Feb 16, 2020 8:51 pm
by Jessica Katzman 4F
The temperature is constant for reversible reactions

Re: How to interpret reversible/irreversible graphs

Posted: Sun Feb 16, 2020 9:05 pm
by Dan M -3E
The temperature is considered "constant" for reversible actions, but not because it doesn't change at all. It's constant because the change is so slow that at an instantaneous moment, it is not really changing. Plus, the system temp and the surrounding temp stay the same as each other.

Re: How to interpret reversible/irreversible graphs

Posted: Sun Feb 16, 2020 9:06 pm
by Shivam Rana 1D
For a pressure versus volume graph a reversible process, which is usually isothermic, will be a curved line. An irreversible reaction will be a straight line.

Re: How to interpret reversible/irreversible graphs

Posted: Wed Feb 19, 2020 3:48 pm
by Eva Zhao 4I
Something to note is that the work a system can do is greatest in a reversible process, hence the larger area under the curve for the reversible graph. The graphs are attached to this for your convenience.
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