Standard Delta G vs Non-Standard Delta G






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MaryBanh_2K
Posts: 101
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:21 am

Standard Delta G vs Non-Standard Delta G

Postby MaryBanh_2K » Thu Mar 05, 2020 6:21 pm

Does the standard delta G (with the degree sign) mean the reaction is at equilibrium? Can you also find standard delta G (with the degree sign) with the Q value or does it only with the equilibrium constant, K?

Suraj Doshi 2G
Posts: 100
Joined: Fri Aug 02, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Standard Delta G vs Non-Standard Delta G

Postby Suraj Doshi 2G » Thu Mar 05, 2020 6:26 pm

The degree sign (naught) indicates "at standard conditions" whereas without it conditions could be skewed.

Tiffany Chao 2H
Posts: 117
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Standard Delta G vs Non-Standard Delta G

Postby Tiffany Chao 2H » Thu Mar 05, 2020 11:00 pm

If you are provided delta G, R, T, and Q, then you can find standard delta G. However, if you are given K, it means that the reaction has reached equilibrium and delta G = 0, therefore you would get the equation standard delta G = -RTlnK.

EvanWang
Posts: 101
Joined: Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Standard Delta G vs Non-Standard Delta G

Postby EvanWang » Thu Mar 05, 2020 11:06 pm

just means that the reaction is happening at one atmosphere and all species concentrations are one molarity.

Cindy Adiwidjaja 1B
Posts: 100
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Standard Delta G vs Non-Standard Delta G

Postby Cindy Adiwidjaja 1B » Sun Mar 08, 2020 11:29 pm

Delta G just means that the compound is in Standard Conditions. What this means is that it is at 1.0 atm, 25 degrees Celcius, and 1 Molarity.


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