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ΔGionization

Posted: Sun Mar 15, 2020 11:25 pm
by Abigail Menchaca_1H
Is there a different way to calculate ΔG ionization?

Re: ΔGionization

Posted: Sun Mar 15, 2020 11:41 pm
by Rhea Shah 2F
I don't think so! It should be the same as the regular way of calculating standard gibbs free energy.

Re: ΔGionization

Posted: Sun Mar 15, 2020 11:42 pm
by Ashley Nguyen 2L
I believe that deltaG ionization is calculated the same as normal standard gibbs free energy.

Re: ΔGionization

Posted: Mon Mar 16, 2020 12:38 am
by Diana A 2L
Would delta G ionization be the same for other temperatures besides 25 degrees Celsius? Let's say for example you're taking the delta G of ionization for a reaction at 30 degrees Celsius, would you use just the standard equations for delta G? I hope that question makes sense, please someone help I want to know.

Re: ΔGionization

Posted: Mon Mar 16, 2020 6:20 am
by Tauhid Islam- 1H
I'm pretty sure all standard state quantities are dependent on time. Gibb's free energy change is a function of temperature so at different temperatures, you would have different energies.

Re: ΔGionization

Posted: Mon Mar 16, 2020 8:26 am
by Diana A 2L
Tauhid Islam- 1H wrote:I'm pretty sure all standard state quantities are dependent on time. Gibb's free energy change is a function of temperature so at different temperatures, you would have different energies.


In that case, how would you calculate Gibbs Free Energy at non-standard temperature?

Re: ΔGionization

Posted: Mon Mar 16, 2020 2:00 pm
by Ying Yan 1F
I don't think there is another way, calculating for delta Gionization is the same as calculating for delta Go.

Re: ΔGionization

Posted: Mon Mar 16, 2020 2:28 pm
by Ellen Amico 2L
Nope! you can use any of the equations for calculating deltaG. I think it's just a way to label it relating to the reaction.

Re: ΔGionization

Posted: Tue Mar 17, 2020 10:45 pm
by Diana A 2L
Ellen Amico 2L wrote:Nope! you can use any of the equations for calculating deltaG. I think it's just a way to label it relating to the reaction.


Thank you! I understand now:)