Oxidation States

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Ye Rim Park 1J
Posts: 11
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Oxidation States

Postby Ye Rim Park 1J » Fri Jan 29, 2016 4:42 pm

I don't know if this was said in class already, but will we be required to memorize any common oxidation states at some point during the course? I know Lavelle mentioned a few, like O-2 and the halogens.

Maya Schnall 3J
Posts: 11
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Oxidation States

Postby Maya Schnall 3J » Fri Jan 29, 2016 7:24 pm

He hasn't mentioned any more yet since the first day of electrochemistry in the course reader, so hopefully not.

Spencer Johnson 1C
Posts: 9
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Oxidation States

Postby Spencer Johnson 1C » Sat Jan 30, 2016 11:16 am

I don't think so. I think he said they would be given to us on the test kind of like the bond enthalpies were given.

annchen0628
Posts: 11
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Oxidation States

Postby annchen0628 » Sat Jan 30, 2016 4:07 pm

You can also work out most of the oxidation states from the equation given.

Bryan Trieu 1F
Posts: 11
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Oxidation States

Postby Bryan Trieu 1F » Sat Jan 30, 2016 4:45 pm

I doubt that we would have to know any oxidation states for obscure examples but the basics most likely are fair game

Jasminemay Barcelon 2G
Posts: 21
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Oxidation States

Postby Jasminemay Barcelon 2G » Sat Feb 13, 2016 11:31 am

I memorized a few oxidation states for the midterm and I somewhat remember how to calculate them from Chem 14A, however I was wondering what other methods you guys implemented in finding the oxidation states for the cathodes and anodes because it took quite a while for me to be sure with my answers.

Amy Pai
Posts: 25
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Oxidation States

Postby Amy Pai » Thu Feb 18, 2016 11:42 am

For oxidation states of individual atoms in a polyatomic ion, I basically just go by H is 1+ (Alkali group +1), O is 2- (along with most halogens), and the alkaline earth metals are 2+. So basically following the trend with how many valence electrons they need.

The oxidation states you need to find are usually for cationic metals, so just add up all other charges listed above, subtract from the overall polyatomic charge, and get the remaining for the last element.

Rachel Russell 4B
Posts: 12
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Oxidation States

Postby Rachel Russell 4B » Sun Feb 21, 2016 7:25 pm

Is there a way to figure out what each oxidation state is or does it just have to be memorized for each atom?

Andrew Yoon 1L
Posts: 14
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Oxidation States

Postby Andrew Yoon 1L » Sun Feb 21, 2016 11:15 pm

I think that the only oxidation states that you have to memorize for this class are O = 2- and H = 1+. Those two were the only ones I needed when solving practice problems. Outside of this class, there is an oxidation number hierarchy that can be seen here: https://chem142.wikispaces.com/Hierarchical+Rules+For+Assiging+Oxidation+States


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