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Easy way to remember when electrons are lost/gained

Posted: Fri Feb 03, 2017 7:17 pm
by trase aguigam 2A
Hi all!

I found myself having a difficult time remembering when electrons are gained/lost in a redox reaction and I remember my chemistry teacher in high school showing me a cool trick.

OIL RIG

Oxidation Is Loss

Reduction Is Gain

:)

Re: Easy way to remember when electrons are lost/gained

Posted: Fri Feb 03, 2017 8:12 pm
by edhuang
This is somewhat related to what we talked about in class, but another mnemonic is "LEO the lion goes GER." Losing Electrons is Oxidation, Gaining Electrons is Reduction.

Re: Easy way to remember when electrons are lost/gained

Posted: Fri Feb 03, 2017 8:55 pm
by Mizuno_Mikaela_1D
I just think how with reduction, the oxidation number is literally getting reduced. Clearly since the number is getting reduced, it is getting more negative thus you know it is gaining electrons. I like to think of it this way because it makes it easy when looking at redox reactions to determine what is getting reduced because I just look for the one whose oxidation number goes from a larger value to a smaller.

Re: Easy way to remember when electrons are lost/gained

Posted: Fri Feb 03, 2017 11:34 pm
by Michelle Kam 1F
This is what they teach you in the Life Science classes
OIL: Oxidation is Loss
RIG: Reduction is Gain

In Chemistry classes, it seems like they teach you LEO and GER
LEO: Losing electron is Oxidation
GER: Gaining electron is Reduction
They try to make it like "LEO the lion says GER" or something like that.

I personally prefer OIL RIG just because the work I'm looking for is in the beginning, so it comes to me more quickly.
Whereas, for LEO GER, it kind of takes me a while to find the word I want.
It's like "Oxidation" what was that again? LEO or GER?... but with OIL and RIG, Oxidation starts with O, so OIL.

Re: Easy way to remember when electrons are lost/gained

Posted: Sat Feb 04, 2017 3:04 pm
by Yi Ying Chen 3N
My high school chemistry teacher taught me this trick to remember that reduction takes place at the cathode and oxidation takes place at the anode.

reduction, cathode = RED CAT
anode, oxidation = AN OX