Intensive property

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Wesley_Rugen_1E
Posts: 23
Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2016 3:00 am

Intensive property

Postby Wesley_Rugen_1E » Sun Feb 05, 2017 4:17 pm

Can someone explain why standard reduction potential is an intensive property, versus an extensive property? I'm still confused as to why standard reduction potential is considered a intensive property.

yoonjong_han_3F
Posts: 15
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:55 pm

Re: Intensive property

Postby yoonjong_han_3F » Sun Feb 05, 2017 4:34 pm

It is not depended on n. That's why it is intensive property.

Isn't it???

Maria_Contreras_3A
Posts: 13
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2016 3:00 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Intensive property

Postby Maria_Contreras_3A » Sun Feb 05, 2017 4:39 pm

yes. it is mainly an intensive property because it does not depend on the number of reactions occurring. it is a fixed number

Milan M
Posts: 10
Joined: Tue Nov 10, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Intensive property

Postby Milan M » Sun Feb 05, 2017 4:49 pm

I had the same question. An intensive property is a property that doesn't depend on the physical quantity, like density. You could double a half reaction to balance the electrons, but since the standard reduction potential is constant it does not need to be double. Since 1 volt = 1 joule per coulomb, if the number of moles is doubled, the coulombs are doubled, and so is the number of joules.The doubling doesn't make much of a difference. An extensive property is one in which the physical quantity of the system actually matters, like mass or entropy.

Hue_Vo_1D
Posts: 19
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:56 pm

Re: Intensive property

Postby Hue_Vo_1D » Sun Feb 05, 2017 9:06 pm

The unit Volt might make you confused.

1Volt=1Joule/Coulomb->similar to other intensive value such as density (g/mL). Standard reduction potential is a fixed value.

Note: this means that if you multiply the half reaction by a constant, you don't multiply E° by the same constant since E° is an intensive property and is always the same - for that specific half reaction.


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