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oxidation

Posted: Tue Feb 06, 2018 8:05 pm
by Naana Boateng 1I
How do you find the oxidation state number?

Re: oxidation

Posted: Tue Feb 06, 2018 8:32 pm
by Jasmine Wu 1L
Toolbox K.1 does a good job explaining how to assign oxidation numbers. Use it as a reference to help you!

In summary, the oxidation number for groups 1 and 2 is equal to their group number. The halogens have an oxidation number of -1. For oxygen it is -2. Hydrogen combined with nonmetals is +1, while combined with metals is -1. An uncombined element's oxidation number is 0.

Re: oxidation

Posted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 3:23 pm
by Christina Bedrosian 1B
you essentially look at the elements location in the periodic table. if it is in the first two groups, it will be +1 and +2 (the group number) and if it is in the last couple of groups, it will be -3, -2, -1 (corresponding to group 15, 16, 17)

Re: oxidation

Posted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 3:30 pm
by Eli Aminpour 2K
If the element you are trying to find the oxidation number for is a transition metal, the oxidation number depends on the other elements in the compound. If its an ion, subtract the net oxidation numbers of the other elements in the compound (oxygen is almost always -2) from the total charge of the ion, and the remaining number should be the oxidation number

Re: oxidation

Posted: Sun Feb 18, 2018 8:08 pm
by Cassandra Mullen 1E
Most of the halogens have a -1 oxidation number, but there are exceptions if the atom is bonded to a more electronegative element. Oxygen usually has an oxidation number of -2, unless it's in oxygen difluoride, where the oxidation number is +2. In peroxides, oxygen has a oxidation state of +1.