Standard Reduction Potentials Concept

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

nathansalce 3e
Posts: 52
Joined: Thu Jul 27, 2017 2:01 am

Standard Reduction Potentials Concept

Postby nathansalce 3e » Thu Feb 08, 2018 4:25 pm

To create a redox reaction, one of the methods is to take both standard reductions of the compounds of interest, make sure the equation is balanced, and then flip the sign of the second reduction. This flipping of the sign of the standard reduction, is that the same thing as converting this reduction into a standard oxidation potential? or is this different?

andrewr2H
Posts: 29
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 6:05 am

Re: Standard Reduction Potentials Concept

Postby andrewr2H » Thu Feb 08, 2018 5:06 pm

Essentially, yes it is. If you flip the reaction the electrons will appear on the right side of the equation thus making it an oxidation reaction. However, I'm not sure if there is any thing "officially" as a standard oxidation potential.

AnuPanneerselvam1H
Posts: 52
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 6:07 am

Re: Standard Reduction Potentials Concept

Postby AnuPanneerselvam1H » Thu Feb 08, 2018 9:31 pm

Yes, when you flip a reduction equation, you are basically running the reverse reaction, which is oxidation. You will also need to take the negative of the standard reduction potential.

Magdalena Palavecino 1A
Posts: 54
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 6:04 am

Re: Standard Reduction Potentials Concept

Postby Magdalena Palavecino 1A » Wed Feb 14, 2018 10:14 pm

I understand that all values are for standard reduction potentials, but when using the Ecell=Ecathode-Eanode we plug in both values for the reduction potential of the equations from the anode and cathode even when we know the reaction at the anode is actually the reverse reaction since it is actually being oxidized?

Hazem Nasef 1I
Posts: 51
Joined: Tue Oct 10, 2017 6:13 am

Re: Standard Reduction Potentials Concept

Postby Hazem Nasef 1I » Sun Feb 18, 2018 11:58 am

Magdalena Palavecino 1A wrote:I understand that all values are for standard reduction potentials, but when using the Ecell=Ecathode-Eanode we plug in both values for the reduction potential of the equations from the anode and cathode even when we know the reaction at the anode is actually the reverse reaction since it is actually being oxidized?

Dr. Lavelle showed us the two methods in class for calculating the Ecell potential. One of those was to use the equation you wrote, Ecathode-Eanode and plug in the reduction potential for both anode and cathode. The other was to to add the two balanced half-reactions, reversing the appropriate equation, and therefore changing the sign of one the E values. You then add these values. So, in Ecathode-Eanode, the negative sign accounts for the fact that both values are reduction potentials. In the other method, reversing the equation and sign of E value accounts for this, making one of the values oxidation cell potential.


Return to “Balancing Redox Reactions”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Samantha Hoegl Roy 2C and 1 guest