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Oxidation Number

Posted: Fri Mar 09, 2018 6:49 pm
by Kassandra Molina 2B
The example of the textbook 14.1 says that Mn has an oxidation number of +7, where does this number come from?

Re: Oxidation Number

Posted: Fri Mar 09, 2018 7:18 pm
by Deap Bhandal L1 S1J
The oxidation number of elements will usually add up to the overall charge of the ion. For example, in MnO4 with a charge of 1-, the oxidation numbers of the atoms must add up to -1. Oxygen will be -2 in most cases, and since there are 4 oxygen atoms, Mn would have an oxidation number of +7. +7 +4(-2) = -1 Mn solid will have an oxidation number of 0 since it is neutral. Hope this helps!

Re: Oxidation Number

Posted: Fri Mar 09, 2018 7:47 pm
by Sara Varadharajulu
aside from set elements like 0, H, etc, the oxidation number can very depending on the compound. most of the time by knowing that 0 is 2- and H is +1 you can figure out the rest of the oxidation states.

Re: Oxidation Number

Posted: Sun Mar 11, 2018 10:38 pm
by Kayla Tchorz-Dis 1F
finding the oxidation of a molecule that isn't standard depends entirely upon the the oxidation number of the molecule with standard oxidation values, like O and H. they usually have to equal each other, so just make sure the charges cancel out. hope that makes sense

Re: Oxidation Number

Posted: Mon Mar 12, 2018 10:11 am
by Annie Lieu-1H
The overall charge of a molecule is the number charged to it and the end (if there's nothing there, set the charge equal to zero). Then we would use set oxidation values (O = -2, H= 1) and add it to X (or times it by a coefficient) of the oxidation charge we DON't know. Then we set that to the overall charge and solve for X. [In this problem, that would be Mn]. Hope this helps.