Ranking elements

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Jacquelyn Hill 1
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Ranking elements

Postby Jacquelyn Hill 1 » Sun Mar 11, 2018 5:00 pm

How can you determine the amount of reducing or oxidizing power that an element has compared to other elements so that you can rank them in order of increasing or decreasing power?

Sabrina Dunbar 1I
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Re: Ranking elements

Postby Sabrina Dunbar 1I » Sun Mar 11, 2018 5:22 pm

No, there is not a periodic trend we can rely on for this type of deduction. You need the reduction half reactions to determine which element in a reaction has a greater oxidizing or reducing power.

Farah Ahmad 2A
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Re: Ranking elements

Postby Farah Ahmad 2A » Sun Mar 11, 2018 5:23 pm

You would look at the standard potential of the reaction. The higher standard potential value, the stronger it is as an oxidizing agent. While, the smaller (or more negative) the standard potential is, the stronger it is as a reducing agent.

Wenjie Dong 2E
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Re: Ranking elements

Postby Wenjie Dong 2E » Sun Mar 11, 2018 10:18 pm

You could refer to activity series of metals. For example, https://www.thoughtco.com/activity-seri ... als-603960.

Kayla Tchorz-Dis 1F
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Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2017 3:00 am

Re: Ranking elements

Postby Kayla Tchorz-Dis 1F » Sun Mar 11, 2018 10:36 pm

the more negative the number, the higher reducing potential that element has. You would be given the values and just rank them from that.

Ridhi Ravichandran 1E
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Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:01 am

Re: Ranking elements

Postby Ridhi Ravichandran 1E » Mon Mar 12, 2018 1:41 am

You would look at standard reduction potentials. the key here is the word reduction, however. you MUST look at reduction potentials, not oxidation potentials, because the signs matter. if you're looking at a reduction potential, the more positive, the more oxidizing power, and the more negative, the more reducing power.

Annie Lieu-1H
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Re: Ranking elements

Postby Annie Lieu-1H » Mon Mar 12, 2018 10:07 am

Like in the test, you will be given the standard reduction potentials and you must judge from there. For context: The more positive the potential is the more likely it will be reduced.

So using deductive reasoning, the more negative the potential, the less likely it will be reduced (and more likely it will be oxidized).

Rishi Khettry 1L
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Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:05 am

Re: Ranking elements

Postby Rishi Khettry 1L » Sat Mar 17, 2018 2:07 am

By looking at standard reduction potentials, you can determine the reducing or oxidizing power. The more positive the potential, the greater the electron pulling power of the reduction half-reaction which means it is more likely to be reduced.

melissa carey 1f
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Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:06 am

Re: Ranking elements

Postby melissa carey 1f » Sat Mar 17, 2018 11:17 am

I like to keep this chart in mind.
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