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Oxidation States

Posted: Thu Feb 21, 2019 1:51 pm
by Mya Majewski 1L
As stated in Lecture, Mn has a +7 charge- is their a table we should memorize in order to determine oxidation states?

Re: Oxidation States

Posted: Thu Feb 21, 2019 2:02 pm
by ThomasLai1D
I think Dr. Lavelle said that we would not need to memorize oxidation states of elements, but that they would be easy to figure out from the reaction and the compound it is in.

Re: Oxidation States

Posted: Thu Feb 21, 2019 2:12 pm
by PranitKumaran1F
Oxidation states of elements such as transition metals can be calculated based on the reaction they are in, so they don't need to be memorized.

Re: Oxidation States

Posted: Thu Feb 21, 2019 2:39 pm
by Nicole Lee 4E
Some elements have too many possible oxidation states to memorize. They should be calculable from the reaction.

Re: Oxidation States

Posted: Thu Feb 21, 2019 3:46 pm
by tierra parker 1J
we don't have to memorize the oxidation states for transition metals since they could have more than one, but we should know the oxidation states of like carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen

Re: Oxidation States

Posted: Thu Feb 21, 2019 4:04 pm
by Eric Quach 1C
we don't have to memorize the oxidation states of metals, as they change depending on the compound. Just make sure to memorize the states for oxygen, the halogens, groups 1 and 2 and with that you can figure out the oxidation states of the metals.

Re: Oxidation States

Posted: Thu Feb 21, 2019 4:20 pm
by A De Castro 14B 2H
You can use Toolbox K.1 in the 6th edition of the textbook to determine the basic oxidation states. As for metals, it usually depends on the other atoms in the molecule they're in. This is because transition metals can have a range of oxidation states, like the ones in the attached image (the ones in green are common).

Re: Oxidation States

Posted: Thu Feb 21, 2019 4:28 pm
by Nicklas_Wright_1A
Mn does not always have an oxidation state of 7+. That was only true for that particular example.

Re: Oxidation States

Posted: Thu Feb 21, 2019 4:56 pm
by Jake Gordon 1A
oxidation state of any pure element is 0 ex Cu
a charged monoatomic ion is just equal to the charge ex Cl- is -1 and Ag+ is +1
diatomic ions must add up to the total charge ex HCO3- H is +1 C is +4 and 3 oxygens O is -2 each for a total of -1
group one is +1 group 2 is +2 carbon is usually +- 4 oxygen is -2 except with H2O2 and halogens are -1

Re: Oxidation States

Posted: Thu Feb 21, 2019 5:25 pm
by Phan Tran 1K
The best way to find the oxidation state of a transition metal is to use the oxidation states of the other molecules in the compound witht he transition metal.

Re: Oxidation States

Posted: Thu Feb 21, 2019 6:18 pm
by Melody P 2B
This may be of some help!!! It can also be found on the course website
Balancing_Redox_Reactions_Acidic_Conditions.pdf
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