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Test #2

Posted: Fri Mar 01, 2019 11:53 am
by deniise_garciia
How do you know to label each element in increasing power? It was a test #2 question.

Re: Test #2

Posted: Fri Mar 01, 2019 12:48 pm
by Semi Yoon
If you see the standard reduction potential chart, the one with the higher (more positive) cell potential will be a stronger oxidizing agent while the one with the more negative cell potential will be a stronger reducing agent.

Re: Test #2

Posted: Sat Mar 02, 2019 7:43 pm
by Matthew Mar 1J
You should be careful when reading the question though, because sometimes the requested redox reaction will be the reverse of what is listed in the table so you have to flip the sign before ordering them.

Re: Test #2

Posted: Sat Mar 02, 2019 8:56 pm
by Kevin Tang 4L
If you want more practice for this type of question 14.25 in the 6th edition of the book is a good resource. It gets confusing for me because you have to reverse the E value and understand if the question is asking for the strength as a reducing or oxidizing agent and whether it is asking the strength of (using Cu as example) Cu or Cu 2+

Re: Test #2

Posted: Sun Mar 03, 2019 7:27 pm
by George Ghaly 2L
The higher the reduction potential the easier it is for a species to be reduced and the lower the reduction potential the easier it is foe a species to be oxidized.

Re: Test #2

Posted: Sun Mar 03, 2019 10:07 pm
by Jchellis 1I
Was this covered in class? Or were we just expected to know it?

Re: Test #2

Posted: Sun Mar 03, 2019 11:58 pm
by Kevin Tang 4L
Jchellis 1I wrote:Was this covered in class? Or were we just expected to know it?


Don't recall if this particular type of problem was explicitly covered in class, but we should know this based on the information that Lavelle has given us. It is also in our homework which suggests we are expected to know it.

Re: Test #2

Posted: Mon Mar 04, 2019 10:31 am
by Mona El Masri 1F
Higher E value= more reducing power
Lower E value= more oxidizing power

Re: Test #2

Posted: Sat Mar 09, 2019 8:44 am
by Sapna Ramappa 1J
If you're looking for increasing oxidizing power, you need to see which elements have a higher chance of being reduced. In other words, you'd see which values have the highest standard reduction potential and are the most positive. If you're looking for increasing reducing power, you need to see which elements have the most negative standard reduction potentials.

Re: Test #2

Posted: Sun Mar 10, 2019 8:58 pm
by allisoncarr1i
Jchellis 1I wrote:Was this covered in class? Or were we just expected to know it?

It was mentioned in the homework problems for this section.

Re: Test #2

Posted: Mon Mar 11, 2019 3:50 pm
by Nicolle Fernandez 1E
How do we find out which two to pair in order to get the greatest Gibbs difference it was the last part of this question.