oxidation vs reduction

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

Sarah Blake-2I
Posts: 153
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:16 am

oxidation vs reduction

Postby Sarah Blake-2I » Sun Feb 16, 2020 11:21 am

How can you tell if a compound is going through oxidation vs when it is undergoing reduction?

Isabella Dal Porto 1H
Posts: 100
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:16 am

Re: oxidation vs reduction

Postby Isabella Dal Porto 1H » Sun Feb 16, 2020 11:22 am

Oxidation is when a reactant loses electrons during the reaction whereas reduction occurs when it gains electrons during the reaction.

Matt F
Posts: 100
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Re: oxidation vs reduction

Postby Matt F » Sun Feb 16, 2020 11:31 am

In addition, you can tell by looking at the reaction and observing the oxidation numbers of reactants and products. If the oxidation number increases, the reactant was oxidated, and if the oxidation number decreases, the reactant was reduced

Veronica Lu 2H
Posts: 89
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:18 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: oxidation vs reduction

Postby Veronica Lu 2H » Sun Feb 16, 2020 11:35 am

Leo goes Ger [censored]
Losing electrons = oxidation
Gaining electrons= reduction

905373636
Posts: 62
Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2019 12:15 am

Re: oxidation vs reduction

Postby 905373636 » Sun Feb 16, 2020 11:43 am

Veronica Lu 2H wrote:Leo goes Ger [censored]
Losing electrons = oxidation
Gaining electrons= reduction


Similarly, OIL RIG helps me:

Oxidation is Loss

Reduction is Gain

Kavya Immadisetty 2B
Posts: 106
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:17 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: oxidation vs reduction

Postby Kavya Immadisetty 2B » Sun Feb 16, 2020 12:21 pm

LEO the lion goes GER. LEO: lose electrons oxidation GER: gain electrons reduction.

The idea is that when an element's oxidation number (number of electrons) goes down, it's reduced. So gaining electrons will reduce the oxidation number.

Frank He 4G
Posts: 50
Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2019 12:19 am

Re: oxidation vs reduction

Postby Frank He 4G » Sun Feb 16, 2020 12:25 pm

Personally, I've always just memorized it as reduction being a reduction in the charge. So if the charge is reduced, then that has to mean an electron is gained.

Maia_Jackson_2C
Posts: 101
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:17 am

Re: oxidation vs reduction

Postby Maia_Jackson_2C » Sun Feb 16, 2020 1:58 pm

Frank He 4G wrote:Personally, I've always just memorized it as reduction being a reduction in the charge. So if the charge is reduced, then that has to mean an electron is gained.

But does this always work? for example in molecules in which the net charge stays the same, but the number of electrons in each atom is different, or would that still work because the individual charges of the atoms is changing?

Natalie Benitez 1E
Posts: 100
Joined: Fri Aug 02, 2019 12:15 am

Re: oxidation vs reduction

Postby Natalie Benitez 1E » Sun Feb 16, 2020 2:04 pm

How do you determine an elements oxidation number ?

Janet Nguy 2C
Posts: 115
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:17 am

Re: oxidation vs reduction

Postby Janet Nguy 2C » Sun Feb 16, 2020 2:09 pm

You can think about reduction as a reduction of positive charge. (gain of electrons)
Oxidation would be adding positive charge. (losing electrons)

Janet Nguy 2C
Posts: 115
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:17 am

Re: oxidation vs reduction

Postby Janet Nguy 2C » Sun Feb 16, 2020 2:12 pm

Natalie Benitez 1E wrote:How do you determine an elements oxidation number ?


There's a few general rules for this:

For any element, oxidation number is 0. (ex: He, O2)
Oxygen is usually 2-
Hydrogen is usually 1+
All charges must add up to the overall charge of the molecule (ex: for the MnO4- ion, the oxidation number for Oxygen is 2- and since there are four of them, the charge for the oxygens is -8. To make an overall charge of -1, Mn must have an oxidation number of 7+).

Maia_Jackson_2C
Posts: 101
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:17 am

Re: oxidation vs reduction

Postby Maia_Jackson_2C » Sun Feb 16, 2020 2:17 pm

Natalie Benitez 1E wrote:How do you determine an elements oxidation number ?

I think its just the number of electrons that were lost or gained during a reaction, so you would basically just count them. If you look back at when we studied transition metals in 14A we also learned about this there. You have to count the number of electrons based on the other atoms and the charge of the overall molecule, for example in K2CrO K has a +1 charge, but there are two of them so it would be +2, and O has a charge of -2 so it's total would be -8. The molecule is neutral so to find the oxidation number of Cr you would do 2 + Cr - 8 = 0 so Cr has an oxidation number of +6.

805097738
Posts: 180
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:20 am

Re: oxidation vs reduction

Postby 805097738 » Sun Feb 16, 2020 4:45 pm

if the compound is oxidized, it will lose electrons. And if it is reduced, it will gain electrons. You can determine which process the compound undergoes by looking at its change in charge.

faithkim1L
Posts: 105
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:17 am

Re: oxidation vs reduction

Postby faithkim1L » Sun Feb 16, 2020 4:48 pm

Oxidation is when the reactant will lose an (or more than one) electron. Reduction reactants will gain electrons during the reaction. LEO GRR is really helpful for me.

ashwathinair
Posts: 113
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Re: oxidation vs reduction

Postby ashwathinair » Sun Feb 16, 2020 4:49 pm

In oxidation, an atom loses electrons while in reduction electrons are gained (OILRIG). Specifically in situations where the electrons are in compounds, the best way to be able to tell if some atom has been oxidized or reduced is by figuring out how many electrons each atom in a compound has throughout the chemical reaction and seeing from there if electrons are gained or lost.

Gabriella Bates 2L
Posts: 113
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:15 am

Re: oxidation vs reduction

Postby Gabriella Bates 2L » Sun Feb 16, 2020 4:59 pm

When a compound looses electrons, it undergoes oxidation, and when it gains electrons, it undergoes reduction. You can tell this by looking at the chemical equation and tracking the electron changes

Trent Yamamoto 2J
Posts: 111
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:18 am

Re: oxidation vs reduction

Postby Trent Yamamoto 2J » Sun Feb 16, 2020 10:50 pm

By definition, oxidation is when there is a loss of electrons (oxidation increases) and reduction is when there is a gain of electrons (oxidation decreases)

Anushka Chauhan2B
Posts: 51
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:16 am

Re: oxidation vs reduction

Postby Anushka Chauhan2B » Sun Feb 16, 2020 11:15 pm

reduction occurs when there is a gain of electrons during the reaction. Oxidation is when there's a loss of electrons during the reaction

Leyna Dang 2H
Posts: 104
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:17 am

Re: oxidation vs reduction

Postby Leyna Dang 2H » Sun Feb 16, 2020 11:16 pm

Oxidation occurs when a molecule loses an electron. Reduction occurs when it gains an electron.

Frank He 4G
Posts: 50
Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2019 12:19 am

Re: oxidation vs reduction

Postby Frank He 4G » Sun Mar 01, 2020 9:09 pm

Maia_Jackson_2C wrote:
Frank He 4G wrote:Personally, I've always just memorized it as reduction being a reduction in the charge. So if the charge is reduced, then that has to mean an electron is gained.

But does this always work? for example in molecules in which the net charge stays the same, but the number of electrons in each atom is different, or would that still work because the individual charges of the atoms is changing?


Sorry for the late reply. It should work if you're looking at just a single atom in a molecule and not the molecule as a whole. For instance, in MnO2, we know that each O has a charge of -2, and each Mn has a charge of +4 that balances out. If that becomes involved in a redox reaction where we get a product of Mn2+, then the charge was reduced, meaning Mn was reduced.


Return to “Balancing Redox Reactions”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests