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easier to split?

Posted: Sun Feb 16, 2020 6:31 pm
by Ghadir Seder 1G
Dr. Lavelle said that for redox reactions, its easier to split them into two half reactions? How do we do this using the example he gave in class?

Re: easier to split?

Posted: Sun Feb 16, 2020 6:34 pm
by Janet Nguy 2C
Because his example occurred under acidic conditions, the redox reaction becomes more complicated as ions from the aqueous solutions will interact with each other. This is why he separates them into 2 half-reactions, one for the oxidation reaction and one for the reduction reaction.

Re: easier to split?

Posted: Sun Feb 16, 2020 7:15 pm
by Sidharth D 1E
Lavelle suggested to split the redox reaction into two half reactions which separate the oxidation and the reduction reactions. You can use it to find out which elements are oxidized and reduced, and also balance redox reactions (since the number of electrons transferred should cancel out in the two half reactions combined.

Re: easier to split?

Posted: Sun Feb 16, 2020 8:19 pm
by CalvinTNguyen2D
To better understand the process of a redox reaction, it is recommended to split the reaction into an oxidation and reduction reaction. This lets us identify which species is oxidized and reduced, and also allows us to balance the redox reaction via the electrons.

Re: easier to split?

Posted: Sun Feb 16, 2020 10:14 pm
by Daniel Chen 2L
By the way, it's not meant literally, but figuratively. He separates the reaction equation into parts so that it would be easier to understand.

Re: easier to split?

Posted: Sun Feb 16, 2020 10:17 pm
by chemboi
To add on to previous responses, if you're given an unbalanced (stiochiometrically and unbalanced charge) starting equation, it's much easier to balance the half reactions individually than the net reaction right off the bat.

Re: easier to split?

Posted: Sun Feb 16, 2020 10:19 pm
by ABombino_2J
The splitting of the redox reaction into two half reactions makes it easier to balance the reaction by adding electrons and therefore adding h+ to the opposite side.