Cell Diagrams

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vpena_1I
Posts: 109
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:15 am

Cell Diagrams

Postby vpena_1I » Sat Feb 22, 2020 11:39 am

Why was a platinum electrode used for both cells in 6L.5(b)?
The solutions manual says:
"Pt(s)| I-(aq) | I2(s) || Ce^4+(aq), Ce^3+(aq) | Pt(s)
An inert electrode such as Pt is necessary when both oxidized and reduced species are in the same solution"

When is says oxidized and reduced species, is it referring to I-(aq) and Ce^4+(aq)?
Also, since the skeletal equation we were given was
Ce^4+(aq) + I-(aq) --->I2(s) + Ce^3+(aq)
do we just assume the electrode used was platinum?

Charisse Vu 1H
Posts: 101
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Cell Diagrams

Postby Charisse Vu 1H » Sat Feb 22, 2020 4:48 pm

Yes, Professor Lavelle said during lecture that when there are no conducting solids given in the problem (both the reactant and product are in solution), use Platinum as the electrode. He also said graphite works too but platinum is more common.

Rory Simpson 2F
Posts: 106
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Cell Diagrams

Postby Rory Simpson 2F » Sat Feb 22, 2020 5:43 pm

Platinum is by far the most common electrode so it can be used if there aren't any solids in the problem that could conduct e-. In the problem in lecture for example, the side with Cu(s) didn't need Pt as an electrode because Cu was the electrode and is a conductive solid. However, the side with Fe3+ and Fe2+ didn't have any solid conductors, so Pt is used as the electrode.

preyasikumar_2L
Posts: 101
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Cell Diagrams

Postby preyasikumar_2L » Sat Feb 22, 2020 6:08 pm

Platinum is the most common electrode used in electrochemical cells because it is resistant to oxidation and won't easily react in redox reactions.

faithkim1L
Posts: 105
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Cell Diagrams

Postby faithkim1L » Sun Feb 23, 2020 1:37 pm

Platinum is the most common electrode used in electrochemical cells. It' resistant to oxidation and won't easily react in redox reactions. Pt is an inert conductor which is used to transfer electrons. Lavelle also stated that graphite can also be used I believe, but is not nearly as common as Platinum.

Lauren Tanaka 1A
Posts: 109
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Cell Diagrams

Postby Lauren Tanaka 1A » Sun Feb 23, 2020 1:41 pm

Platinum is used in the problem because there is no conducting solid so platinum is used. Since it is resistant to oxidation it won't react easily in a redox reaction.


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