confusing homework question

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EMurphy_2L
Posts: 128
Joined: Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:16 am

confusing homework question

Postby EMurphy_2L » Wed Mar 04, 2020 4:50 pm

in 6L.5) part b) why do you add Pt as a solid for the Iodine anode reaction? You are already given the solid I2(s) so why to you need an inert conductor?

AArmellini_1I
Posts: 107
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:15 am

Re: confusing homework question

Postby AArmellini_1I » Wed Mar 04, 2020 8:58 pm

It's because the whole point of your solid electrode is that it can conduct electricity (movement of electrons) which only metals can effectively do. So will you do have a solid, iodine cannot be the electrode because it is not a metal

Jessa Maheras 4F
Posts: 121
Joined: Fri Aug 02, 2019 12:16 am

Re: confusing homework question

Postby Jessa Maheras 4F » Sat Mar 07, 2020 3:42 pm

You need an inert conductor in order to complete the cell. Pt is most commonly used to do this, and is also known as a Standard Hydrogen electrode! I found the textbook helpful in explaining this:)

Rebecca Remple 1C
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Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:16 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: confusing homework question

Postby Rebecca Remple 1C » Sat Mar 07, 2020 3:54 pm

EMurphy_2L wrote:in 6L.5) part b) why do you add Pt as a solid for the Iodine anode reaction? You are already given the solid I2(s) so why to you need an inert conductor?

Hi there,

While I2 is a solid, it is not a metal. The electrode needs to be a solid metal to conduct electricity. Therefore solid platinum metal (Pt) is used. If no solid metal is present, you are required to use platinum as the electrode according to traditional electrochemistry rules. The only exception I know of is liquid mercury (Hg) which can be used to conduct electricity. I hope this helps!

-Rebecca

RobertXu_2J
Posts: 104
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:17 am

Re: confusing homework question

Postby RobertXu_2J » Sat Mar 07, 2020 7:23 pm

It is because you need a solid METAL. I2 is not a metal, so you need to add a metal, because you need something to conduct the electrons (metals are able to do this because of metallic bonding, if you remember from Chem 14a, the "sea of electrons" )


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