Practice Quiz 1 Question  [ENDORSED]


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YsabelCheang1H
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Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:59 pm

Practice Quiz 1 Question

Postby YsabelCheang1H » Sun Oct 09, 2016 3:22 pm

The question is FM radio station CHEM broadcasts at 99.5 MHz. Calculate the wavelength of the corresponding radio waves.
What is the question asking for when it states "corresponding radio waves"?

Toshio_Kanazawa_3B
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Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:58 pm

Re: Practice Quiz 1 Question  [ENDORSED]

Postby Toshio_Kanazawa_3B » Sun Oct 09, 2016 4:02 pm

They're just asking for the wavelength of the broadcast's radio waves. Since you know the frequency is 99.5 MHz and you know that radio waves are a type of electromagnetic radiation (so they move at the speed of light), you can just use the equation C = wavelength x frequency and solve for the wavelength. Hope that helps!

Timothy Yu 2M
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Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:58 pm

Re: Practice Quiz 1 Question

Postby Timothy Yu 2M » Sun Oct 09, 2016 10:45 pm

For the units, will they always be in nanometers? Or will we have to like convert it into meters since meters is the SI unit?

William Shu 1G
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Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:56 pm

Re: Practice Quiz 1 Question

Postby William Shu 1G » Thu Oct 13, 2016 6:36 pm

I'm fairly certain that as a wavelength, you can keep the units as nanometers.

aprilhamachi3B
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Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:58 pm

Re: Practice Quiz 1 Question

Postby aprilhamachi3B » Thu Oct 13, 2016 6:56 pm

Unless he specifies, I don't think it matters if you leave it in meters or nanometers. Typically yes the SI unit is meters, but if the question ever asks to compare it to the line spectrum then its easier to compare it when your answer is in nanometers.

Logan 3C
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Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:57 pm

Re: Practice Quiz 1 Question

Postby Logan 3C » Thu Oct 13, 2016 7:32 pm

Actually if you want the units to match up you should put it in meters. A joule (the unit for energy) is comprised of (kg x m^2 / s^2) so if you want the units to better match up you should convert nanometers to meters. Just be sure to convert it back to nanometers if it asks you f this answer is in the visible light spectrum.


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