Balmer Vs. Lyman


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Michelle Steinberg2J
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Balmer Vs. Lyman

Postby Michelle Steinberg2J » Wed Oct 11, 2017 10:16 pm

I was reading through the textbook and came across the Balmer series and the Lyman series. I am having difficulty designating the difference between the two and when to apply them. The textbook states:
" The Balmer series consists of the lines with n1= 2 (and n2= 3, 4, . . .). The Lyman series is a set of lines in the ultraviolet
region of the spectrum with n1=1 (and n2=2, 3, . . .)."

For both, are the electrons moving from its ground state to its excited state? If so, how do you know which series applies?

Emma Boyles 1L
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Re: Balmer Vs. Lyman

Postby Emma Boyles 1L » Thu Oct 12, 2017 12:43 am

I think Balmer series applies when an electron is moving from higher energy levels to the second energy level, n =2. That's why n1 = 2.
Lyman series applies when an electron is moving from higher energy levels to the first energy level, n= 1. So n1 = 1.

Mia Navarro 1D
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Re: Balmer Vs. Lyman

Postby Mia Navarro 1D » Thu Oct 12, 2017 9:26 pm

Balmer series, the visible region of light, and Lyman series, the UV region of light, each interact with electrons that have ground states in different orbitals. Balmer interacts with electrons that come from the second energy level (n=2), and Lyman interacts with electrons from the first energy level (n=1).

When the n(sub)1 of the Rydenberg equation is a 1, it involves the Lyman series, and when it is a 2, it involves the Balmer series. (TIP: Regardless of whether the process is absorption or emission, the n(sub)1 should be the lowest energy level.)

camrynpatterson3C
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Re: Balmer Vs. Lyman

Postby camrynpatterson3C » Thu Oct 12, 2017 9:37 pm

Basically, as Mia said, use the Lyman series in the Rydberg equation when n1 is 1, and the Balmer series when n1 is 2. I don't believe that the Balmer series with n1=2 means that the electrons are starting in their ground state, or else it would be equal to 1. I believe the Balmer series applies when an electron moves from the second energy level to a higher energy level. However, I don't believe that Professor Lavelle will be requiring us to really differentiate between the two.

Michael Cheng 1C
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Re: Balmer Vs. Lyman

Postby Michael Cheng 1C » Thu Oct 12, 2017 11:19 pm

I am confused as to what n1 and n2 represent. What exactly does it symbolize?

Hyein Cha 2I
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Re: Balmer Vs. Lyman

Postby Hyein Cha 2I » Thu Oct 12, 2017 11:27 pm

I read that section of the textbook (about the series), but I do not even get what those series are supposed to represent.. or what purpose they serve.. can someone explain please?

Also, there is the expression for balmer series and rydberg, but what is the expression for the Lyman series?

Thanks!

Girija_3E
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Re: Balmer Vs. Lyman

Postby Girija_3E » Fri Oct 13, 2017 11:33 am

Michael Cheng 1B wrote:I am confused as to what n1 and n2 represent. What exactly does it symbolize?


n1 and n2 as well as n3, n4...(so on) each represent the different energy levels that electrons occupy within an atom, where n1 would be the energy level closest to the nucleus (lowest energy level). Further, electrons with high energy (in further energy levels) have a low wavelength and a high frequency, whereas electrons with a low energy would have a high wavelength and low frequency. Hope that helps!

Rachel Wang
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Re: Balmer Vs. Lyman

Postby Rachel Wang » Fri Oct 13, 2017 12:13 pm

Balmer series is the visible region of the light spectrum and Lyman is the UV region. When the electron jumps from quantum level n=2 to n=1, this releases much more energy than when it jumps from n=3 to n=2.
Lyman's principle quantum level is n=1 because UV light has higher energy.
Balmer's principle quantum level is n = 2 because visible light has lower energy.

Ethan Vuong 3G
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Re: Balmer Vs. Lyman

Postby Ethan Vuong 3G » Fri Oct 13, 2017 4:54 pm

How does one determine whether emission is in part of the balmer series or lyman series? I know that the visible region is associated with the balmer series and the ultraviolet region associates the lyman series, but how do we determine the energy value?

Hyein Cha 2I
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Re: Balmer Vs. Lyman

Postby Hyein Cha 2I » Fri Oct 13, 2017 9:35 pm

Ethan Vuong 3G wrote:How does one determine whether emission is in part of the balmer series or lyman series? I know that the visible region is associated with the balmer series and the ultraviolet region associates the lyman series, but how do we determine the energy value?


It's part of balmer series when energy that electrons come to rest at is 2, and use lyman if energy lvl that electrons come to rest at is 1.

Jason Liu 1C
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Re: Balmer Vs. Lyman

Postby Jason Liu 1C » Fri Oct 13, 2017 10:36 pm

What relationship do these series have with the elements? Do all elements have these series? Are the different series only referring to the electrons?

Mike Matthews 1D
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Re: Balmer Vs. Lyman

Postby Mike Matthews 1D » Sat Oct 14, 2017 12:01 am

When an electron drops down energy levels, it releases its energy as a photon and light is emitted. The Lyman Series consists of the wavelengths of light that are emitted when an electron drops down from any of the outer orbitals (n=2,3,4,5....) to the first orbital (n=1). Similarly, the Balmer Series consists of the wavelengths of light that are emitted when an electron drops down from any of the outer orbitals (n=3,4,5,6....) to the second orbital. Hope this helps!

Hazem Nasef 1I
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Re: Balmer Vs. Lyman

Postby Hazem Nasef 1I » Sat Oct 14, 2017 12:34 pm

Jason Liu 1A wrote:What relationship do these series have with the elements? Do all elements have these series? Are the different series only referring to the electrons?

The Balmer and Lyman series are specific only to the hydrogen atom, not other elements. They represent the transitions of hydrogen's electron between energy levels. When the hydrogen electron becomes excited to a higher energy level and then falls to the ground state, if it falls to the n=1 energy level, then a photon in the ultraviolet range is emitted by the electron. This transition from a higher energy level to n=1 is part of the Lyman series. If the electron falls from a higher energy level to n=2, a photon of light in the visible range is emitted. That transition is considered part of the Balmer series.


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