Concept // Wave-like Behavior  [ENDORSED]


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Frenz Cabison 1B
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Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am

Concept // Wave-like Behavior

Postby Frenz Cabison 1B » Sat Oct 14, 2017 11:36 pm

Aside from diffraction, what is another evidence that shows that electromagnetic radiation behaves like waves?

Christy Lee 2H
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Re: Concept // Wave-like Behavior  [ENDORSED]

Postby Christy Lee 2H » Sun Oct 15, 2017 12:12 pm

I believe the way light reflects, refracts, diffracts, and interferes all point to its wave-like characteristics.

Kathleen Vidanes 1E
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Re: Concept // Wave-like Behavior

Postby Kathleen Vidanes 1E » Sun Oct 15, 2017 8:45 pm

So, since the emission of electrons is not dependent on the level of intensity that the light is, will changing the wavelength effect its emission?

Bansi Amin 1D
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Re: Concept // Wave-like Behavior

Postby Bansi Amin 1D » Sun Oct 15, 2017 10:48 pm

Kathleen Vidanes 3B wrote:So, since the emission of electrons is not dependent on the level of intensity that the light is, will changing the wavelength effect its emission?

I'm assuming the its refers to electrons. With that assumption, the changing of the wavelength will effect the emission of the electron. For the electron to be emitted the wavelength has to be lower than the cutoff wavelength for the particular metal. As long as the changed wavelength is lower than the threshold wavelength, and the required energy is present, then the emission of the electron shouldn't be effected.

Daniel Vo 1B
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Re: Concept // Wave-like Behavior

Postby Daniel Vo 1B » Sun Oct 15, 2017 11:39 pm

I'm pretty sure that if you change the wavelength, you do affect the ejected electron. As the wavelength shortens, you end up with a higher energy from the photon, which in turn transfers a larger kinetic energy to the ejected electron. The number of electrons set off by one photon is always one though; therefore, higher energy photons will only cause the electrons ejected at a higher kinetic energy, but only one electron will be ejected by one photon.


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