Formulas  [ENDORSED]


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Angelica Dis 3k
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Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2017 11:40 am

Formulas

Postby Angelica Dis 3k » Sun Oct 15, 2017 1:24 pm

Hi guys! In lecture we were given the formula En=-hR/n^2 and in the book v=R(1/n2^2-1/n1^2). What is the difference between these two formulas and in what cases would I use them?

Riya Pathare 2E
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Re: Formulas  [ENDORSED]

Postby Riya Pathare 2E » Sun Oct 15, 2017 1:52 pm

If you read in the textbook pg 7 of chapter one you can find that the second formula was written to solve for frequency while the first is written to solve for energy. They are same formula written in different ways however the second one you can use once to find the frequency and then the energy difference but the first one you would have to solve for both energy levels (use the formula twice). Thus you can use either one when trying to save for the energy difference or the frequency of light you need to move between energy levels. Sorry if that was a bit confusing. The book has a better explanation on pg 7

Angelica Dis 3k
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Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2017 11:40 am

Re: Formulas

Postby Angelica Dis 3k » Sun Oct 15, 2017 4:07 pm

thank you so much!

Justin Lau 1D
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Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:00 am

Re: Formulas

Postby Justin Lau 1D » Sun Oct 15, 2017 4:18 pm

Basically the Rydberg Formula, v=R(1/n1^2 - 1/n2^2) is derived from the previous energy formula, E=-hR/n^2. As we know, E=hv. Thus, when we subtract the formulas of energy using the energy level, E=-hR/n1^2 - (-hR/n2^2), we can plug hv to substitute for E. Then, because Planck's constant cancels out on both sides, we're just left with v=R(1/n1^2 - 1/n2^2). The reason the answer is not negative anymore is because the value of frequency cannot be negative.

Michelle Lu 1F
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Re: Formulas

Postby Michelle Lu 1F » Sun Oct 15, 2017 11:59 pm

They can both be derived from one another depending on whether you would like to solve for En or v, using the equation E=-hR/n^2.

Dang Lam
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Joined: Thu Jul 27, 2017 3:01 am

Re: Formulas

Postby Dang Lam » Thu Oct 19, 2017 2:21 pm

You can use both equation because one of them is just the derived equation of the other. However, it is better to use the equation E=-hR/n^2 to find the energy of each "n" level then find the ∆E by subtracting the Einitial from the Efinal. From there you can find the wavelength using E=hv. Using the Rydberg equation might save you some times but it might lead to the wrong answer since you might mix up the final energy level with the initial energy level, and vice versa.


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