Lyman vs Balmer Series


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Megan Purl 1E
Posts: 49
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am

Lyman vs Balmer Series

Postby Megan Purl 1E » Sun Oct 15, 2017 9:16 pm

I don't understand how to determine the spectroscopic series to which a transition belongs. How can you tell if it's a Lyman series or Balmer series?

Andrea Grigsby 1I
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:03 am

Re: Lyman vs Balmer Series

Postby Andrea Grigsby 1I » Sun Oct 15, 2017 9:19 pm

electrons in the Lyman series emit light in the UV region, while electrons in the Balmer series emit light in the visible light region.
So you would look at the wavelength of the light emitted and deduce it from that.

(Im not sure if I answered what you were asking, but yeah)

Alyssa Pelak 1J
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Re: Lyman vs Balmer Series

Postby Alyssa Pelak 1J » Sun Oct 15, 2017 9:20 pm

Balmer series indicates that the electron has moved from another shell to n=2 or from n=2 to another shell. The wavelength that is absorbed or emitted falls into the visible light range. For Lyman series the electron has moved from another shell to n=1 or from n=1 to another shell. The wavelength is shorter and it falls in the UV range.

Gurpreet Khamba 1J
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Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am

Re: Lyman vs Balmer Series

Postby Gurpreet Khamba 1J » Sun Oct 15, 2017 9:36 pm

In the Lyman series, eletrons come to rest at n=1 whereas in the Balmer series, they come to rest at n=2. The latter records the light depicted in the visible light spectrum, the former records the light in the UV spectrum.
Their are other series as well, but in short, the different series simply relate to the resting point

Payton Schwesinger 1J
Posts: 45
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am

Re: Lyman vs Balmer Series

Postby Payton Schwesinger 1J » Mon Oct 16, 2017 3:43 pm

So you can deduce if an electron is in the Balmer or Lyman series by looking at the wavelength of light it absorbs? and then in terms of energy levels if it is a Lyman series that means the electron is starting from or returning to the n=1 energy level and if it is in the Balmer series that means it is starting from or returning to the n=2 energy level?
Just want to make sure I'm understanding that correctly.


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