emission and absorption spectrum


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AtreyiMitra2L
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emission and absorption spectrum

Postby AtreyiMitra2L » Mon Oct 16, 2017 10:47 pm

Are these spectrums interchangeable?

Austin Ho 1E
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Re: emission and absorption spectrum

Postby Austin Ho 1E » Mon Oct 16, 2017 11:08 pm

I believe that atomic/emission/absorption spectrum all refer to the same thing. The way I think of it is that electrons in a Hydrogen atom, for instance, start out at the 'ground state' or lowest possible energy level, n=1. They are then excited by a photon of light that corresponds to the energy difference between n=1 and another principal quantum number, like n=2 for instance. The results in an absorption spectrum. Then, the electron emits a photon of light that once again corresponds to the energy difference. This is the emission spectrum. Since the amount of energy changed is the same, both emission and absorption spectrums are technically the same.

Tldr; they are the same since the amount of energy changed between the absorption and emission is the same.

ami patel
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Re: emission and absorption spectrum

Postby ami patel » Mon Oct 16, 2017 11:08 pm

i would not think they are because they describe two completely different spectrums. i hope this link will be able to explain it to you clearly https://www.researchgate.net/post/Whats ... e_molecule

Lucian1F
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Re: emission and absorption spectrum

Postby Lucian1F » Mon Oct 16, 2017 11:09 pm

The values of the lines will be the same since the energy levels for each element are constant. The lines only change as you change elements. The difference is in what is measured. If the wavelengths/frequencies of light that are being released by the atom are measured, it results in an emission spectrum. If they are being absorbed by the atom, then it results in an absorption spectrum.


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