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Bright Lines and the Atomic Spectra

Posted: Sun Apr 15, 2018 8:45 pm
by jadam_1E
In the textbook, it is stated that "the brightest line (at 656nm) is red" when light is emitted by excited hydrogen atoms and passed through a prism. Does this mean that other light is emitted but red is the brightest because when the excited hydrogen atoms give off em radiation, 656nm em radiation is the most prevalent?

Re: Bright Lines and the Atomic Spectra

Posted: Sun Apr 15, 2018 10:24 pm
by Jimmy lira-1G
Does this mean that other light is emitted but red is the brightest because when the excited hydrogen atoms give off em radiation, 656nm em radiation is the most prevalent?
To answer your question, when the excited hydrogen atoms give off em radiation at 656nm em radiation the only color present is red, as it is the most intense. With that said since it is the most intense out of the four characteristic lines it shows, then red is present. So there are other light shining , but for hydrogen red is dominant and thats what is seen as the red is the most intense on the visible spectrum.
-Hope this answered your question

-Jimmy Lira 1-G

Re: Bright Lines and the Atomic Spectra

Posted: Sun Apr 15, 2018 10:33 pm
by Chem_Mod
In the textbook, it is stated that "the brightest line (at 656nm) is red" when light is emitted by excited hydrogen atoms and passed through a prism. Does this mean that other light is emitted but red is the brightest because when the excited hydrogen atoms give off em radiation, 656nm em radiation is the most prevalent?


Other light is also emitted, but 655nm is the brightest because it is the transition that happens the most. It is the brightest because that particular transition is the most likely to happen because you are most likely exciting the energy to that particular state and then allowing it to emit.