Calculating wavelength  [ENDORSED]


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Maria Roman 1A
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:04 am

Calculating wavelength

Postby Maria Roman 1A » Sun Apr 15, 2018 11:49 pm

How would you arrange the formula to calculate wavelength when the frequency of light is given?

Alexandra Wade 1L
Posts: 32
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:05 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Calculating wavelength

Postby Alexandra Wade 1L » Sun Apr 15, 2018 11:58 pm

You would use the equation c=wavelength x frequency. Therefore you would divide the speed of light or c by the given frequency to find wavelength.

RubyLake1F
Posts: 41
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:03 am

Re: Calculating wavelength  [ENDORSED]

Postby RubyLake1F » Mon Apr 16, 2018 3:41 pm

The attached image is helpful in visualizing the relationship between 'c', wavelength, and frequency. The bottom parts of the pyramid 'wavelength' and 'frequency' multiply to equal the top value 'speed of light', and the top value can divide by either bottom value to get the other bottom value

maxresdefault.jpg
.

source:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIxqRSUDG6s
"Wavelength Frequency Equation" by Marie Stott (2012)

Isobel Tweedt 1E
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:05 am

Re: Calculating wavelength

Postby Isobel Tweedt 1E » Mon Apr 16, 2018 9:23 pm

The basic equation c = fλ can be arranged as you would rearrange an equation in math. By moving around the variables you are keeping the equation the same, but making it easier to select for the unknown value you are trying to find.

For instance, if I want to find the frequency of a wave I would use:
f = c/λ frequency (Hz) = wave speed (m.s-1) / wavelength (m)
Note that the units cancel out to leave s-1, which is equal to Hz (the cycles per second that occur).

Similarly, if I want to find the wavelength I would use:
λ = c/f

Isobel Tweedt 1E
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:05 am

Re: Calculating wavelength

Postby Isobel Tweedt 1E » Mon Apr 16, 2018 9:26 pm

Is there ever a time we would look for a speed other than that of light? Or does this equation only ever use c?


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