1.13 (b)


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Megan Potter 1G
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1.13 (b)

Postby Megan Potter 1G » Mon Apr 16, 2018 8:56 pm

Use the Rydberg formula for atomic hydrogen to calculate the wavelength of radiation generated by the transition from n=4 to n=2. (b) What is the name given to the spectroscopic series to which this transition belongs? (c) Use Table 1.1 to determine the region of the spectrum in which the transition takes place. If the change takes place in the visible region of the spectrum, what is the color of the light that will be emitted?

My question is for part b. I got that the answer for a was 4.86x10^-17 m. How would you know what series it belongs in? The chart in the book seems to have values that aren’t equivalent to the small number I have.

Sarah Brecher 1I
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Re: 1.13 (b)

Postby Sarah Brecher 1I » Mon Apr 16, 2018 9:02 pm

The table is in nanometers so your values should match the table once you convert from meters to nanometers.

Haison Nguyen 1I
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Re: 1.13 (b)

Postby Haison Nguyen 1I » Mon Apr 16, 2018 9:20 pm

Are you sure your answer was 4.86x10^-17 m? My answer was 4.86x10^-7 m and then I converted it to nanometers because the chart itself was in nanometers.

Caitlyn Ponce 1L
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Re: 1.13 (b)

Postby Caitlyn Ponce 1L » Mon Apr 16, 2018 9:28 pm

I think you should double check your answer. Like the previous person said, I believe the answer is 4.86x10^-7 m and it would correspond with the Balmer series.

princessturner1G
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Re: 1.13 (b)

Postby princessturner1G » Mon Apr 16, 2018 10:10 pm

You know it is the Balmer series because the wavelength is 486 nm. When you look at Table 1.1, 486 nm is closest to the wavelength of blue light. Since blue light is a type of visible light, you know that it is the Balmer Series.

Luis Avalos 1D
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Re: 1.13 (b)

Postby Luis Avalos 1D » Mon Apr 16, 2018 11:02 pm

As others have said, your answer should be written in terms of nanometers. I got .486 x 10^-6 which translates to 486 x 10^-9 (486 nanometers). This wavelength corresponds to the balmer series, but more specifically, blue visible light.

Megan Potter 1G
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Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:04 am

Re: 1.13 (b)

Postby Megan Potter 1G » Tue Apr 17, 2018 4:57 pm

oops I just mistyped in my question. I got 4.86 x 10^-7 not 17. thanks!


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