Homework 1.15


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alexagreco1A
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Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:03 am

Homework 1.15

Postby alexagreco1A » Sun May 06, 2018 7:47 pm

In the ultraviolet spectrum of atomic hydrogen, a line is observed at 102.6 nm. Determine the values of n for the initial and final energy levels of the electron.

I understand in this problem that hydrogen gives us n=1, but to find the other energy levels in the solution it converts the wavelength into frequency and then sets this value equal to the Rydberg equation. Why is the frequency substituted for En in this case?

Chem_Mod
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Re: Homework 1.15

Postby Chem_Mod » Sun May 06, 2018 9:53 pm

I am a bit confused by your question. Can you elaborate by what you mean by frequency is substituted for En since En does not have any frequency in its equation?

Joshua Yang 1H
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Re: Homework 1.15

Postby Joshua Yang 1H » Sun May 06, 2018 10:32 pm

alexagreco1A wrote:In the ultraviolet spectrum of atomic hydrogen, a line is observed at 102.6 nm. Determine the values of n for the initial and final energy levels of the electron.

I understand in this problem that hydrogen gives us n=1, but to find the other energy levels in the solution it converts the wavelength into frequency and then sets this value equal to the Rydberg equation. Why is the frequency substituted for En in this case?


I honestly think this is only because the Rydberg Equation is written as v = R( 1/n1^2 - 1/n2^2 )
and so we use the frequency instead of using En directly.


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