C=Delta x V


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Jordan Y4D
Posts: 25
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

C=Delta x V

Postby Jordan Y4D » Sun Oct 07, 2018 1:32 pm

I'm confused on how exactly to use this equation. Does this equation consider the energy of the waves or only the frequency and wave lengths?

marcus lin 1E
Posts: 54
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: C=Delta x V

Postby marcus lin 1E » Sun Oct 07, 2018 1:36 pm

I think you mean lambda instead of delta, but i think the equation only considers the wavelength (lambda) and the frequency (v).

AlyssaBei_1F
Posts: 99
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:17 am

Re: C=Delta x V

Postby AlyssaBei_1F » Sun Oct 07, 2018 1:44 pm

The only equation I can think of is c=(lamba)x(v). I don't think c=delta x v exists.

Maharsh Patel 4E
Posts: 18
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Re: C=Delta x V

Postby Maharsh Patel 4E » Sun Oct 07, 2018 1:50 pm

The equation is actually C=Lambda x V and it does not involve the energy of the wave, but shows that when you multiply frequency and wavelength, it equals a constant.

Layla Manoochehri
Posts: 29
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: C=Delta x V

Postby Layla Manoochehri » Sun Oct 07, 2018 10:16 pm

c is a constant, for speed of light in a vacuum. in class Dr. Lavelle said it's 3.00 x 10^8 m/s.

deepto_mizan1H
Posts: 65
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:16 am

Re: C=Delta x V

Postby deepto_mizan1H » Tue Oct 09, 2018 6:14 pm

Using this equation (C= Lambda x V) we can analyze specific waves of light against the constant that is the speed of light, so we can glean some information on its wavelength, frequency, and additionally from that where it belongs on the electromagnetic spectrum. It's a type of linear equation that can be conceptualized as the ideal gas law's usability, where we can proportionally analyze changes.

Zubair Ahmed 1L
Posts: 81
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:16 am

Re: C=Delta x V

Postby Zubair Ahmed 1L » Tue Oct 09, 2018 6:35 pm

From the equation, c(speed of light, 3*10^8 m/s)=lambda(wavelength, nm)*v(frequency, Hz), you are able to figure out many different variables and understand conceptual topics. For example, the speed of light, "c", is always a constant. This tells us that if that if the wavelength increases, the the frequency will decrease and vice versa.


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