measuring wavelength


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505166714
Posts: 50
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:17 am

measuring wavelength

Postby 505166714 » Sun Oct 21, 2018 3:41 pm

How can I tell if a wavelength is detectable? Is there a limit for current technologies?

Hovik Mike Mkryan 2I
Posts: 95
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: measuring wavelength

Postby Hovik Mike Mkryan 2I » Sun Oct 21, 2018 3:54 pm

Hello, I believe for this class if we refer to the table Dr. Lavelle showed us in class for the wavelengths should suffice. It starts from the y-rays all the way up to long radio waves.

Fionna Shue 4L
Posts: 59
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: measuring wavelength

Postby Fionna Shue 4L » Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:20 pm

In addition, I think Dr. Lavelle mentioned that anything less than 10^-18 m is not detectable.

Rami_Z_AbuQubo_2K
Posts: 89
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2018 3:00 am

Re: measuring wavelength

Postby Rami_Z_AbuQubo_2K » Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:34 pm

He said anything that is less than 10^-18 is not detectable. He will make it very obvious and it will be an extreme either direction.

Javier_Ochoa_DIS_3J
Posts: 33
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

Re: measuring wavelength

Postby Javier_Ochoa_DIS_3J » Fri Oct 26, 2018 12:21 pm

Anything below 10^-18 m is too small to measure.

However professor said that he will give either numbers that are super small or super big compared to 10^-18.

LaurenJuul_1B
Posts: 65
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:17 am

Re: measuring wavelength

Postby LaurenJuul_1B » Fri Oct 26, 2018 12:49 pm

Lavelle's rule of thumb is that anything smaller than 10^-18 will be too small to measure. Conceptually, though, if you are working on the atomic scale wavelength will normally be detected and if you are working with objects that can be seen by the human eye, wavelength will not be able to be detected.


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