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Relationship Between Velocity and Wavelength

Posted: Tue Oct 01, 2019 12:32 am
by DMuth_1J
Hello, I was working on the photoelectric effect module and was stumped by the problem that gives the velocity and the work, and asked us to calculate the energy. I'm not sure how to use the velocity or how it fits into our equations, but thought it might have something to do with wavelength. Can somebody help?

Re: Relationship Between Velocity and Wavelength

Posted: Tue Oct 01, 2019 4:21 pm
by EvanWang
I'm not entirely sure this is correct, but the only instance I've seen velocity and wavelength related is with the work-function equation. This is used to find the energy required to remove an electron from a metal:
E=1/2 m v^2=hv-Φ
1B in the textbook talks about this. Hope it helps.

Re: Relationship Between Velocity and Wavelength

Posted: Wed Oct 02, 2019 12:33 pm
by JOtomo1F
I also need help with this problem.

Re: Relationship Between Velocity and Wavelength

Posted: Wed Oct 02, 2019 1:09 pm
by Clara Cho 2K
What are the units for velocity?

Re: Relationship Between Velocity and Wavelength

Posted: Wed Oct 02, 2019 1:24 pm
by asannajust_1J
Clara Cho wrote:What are the units for velocity?

velocity units are m/s

Re: Relationship Between Velocity and Wavelength

Posted: Thu Oct 03, 2019 11:32 am
by Eesha Sohail 1D
In terms of the original question you asked - the relationship between velocity and wavelength for light is given by this equation:

Where V is the velocity of the wave in meters per second, (lambda) is the wavelength in meters, and f is the frequency, or cycles per second.

I believe for the question you are asking, @EvanWang gave the right equation, but I thought you might appreciate the added context. Hope this helps!

Re: Relationship Between Velocity and Wavelength

Posted: Thu Oct 03, 2019 5:26 pm
by nicole-2B
Eesha Sohail 1J wrote:In terms of the original question you asked - the relationship between velocity and wavelength for light is given by this equation:

Where V is the velocity of the wave in meters per second, (lambda) is the wavelength in meters, and f is the frequency, or cycles per second.

I believe for the question you are asking, @EvanWang gave the right equation, but I thought you might appreciate the added context. Hope this helps!

Thank you for explaining!