HW Question #1A.15


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605379296
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:16 am

HW Question #1A.15

Postby 605379296 » Wed Oct 09, 2019 7:19 pm

How do you know that n1 level is equal to the Lyman series and why can't n2 be the Lyman series? How do you determine which is final and initial energy level?

Baoying Li 1B
Posts: 113
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:18 am

Re: HW Question #1A.15

Postby Baoying Li 1B » Wed Oct 09, 2019 8:19 pm

The "ultraviolet region" is the same as saying the Lyman series, which starts from n1=1. Just remember this.
And I think the final energy level is the inside energy level whereas the initial energy level is the outside energy level. Image the energy level as the target sign. The light shines on the outside and penetrates layer by layer into the center.

xenamclean_1G
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Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:15 am

Re: HW Question #1A.15

Postby xenamclean_1G » Wed Oct 09, 2019 8:20 pm

The final energy level is the one where electron ends up at. The initial is the level at which it starts. For example, going n=2 to n=1; the electron starts at n=2 so this is the initial, it ends up at n=1 so this is the final.

205296774
Posts: 66
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:15 am

Re: HW Question #1A.15

Postby 205296774 » Wed Oct 09, 2019 8:29 pm

During the specific experiment with the hydrogen atom, Lyman detected the ultraviolet rays which occurred when an electron went from below n=1 to n=1 so they were therefore called the "Lyman series" and it's just a name to remember.

You would be told that the electron is going from n= some # to n= different # and, therefore, know that n initial is where the electron began and n final is where it ended.

Hope this helps!

Haley Dveirin 1E
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Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:17 am

Re: HW Question #1A.15

Postby Haley Dveirin 1E » Wed Oct 09, 2019 9:17 pm

Are there any other series like this other than the Lymen series that we need to memorize?

Daria Azizad 1K
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Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:15 am

Re: HW Question #1A.15

Postby Daria Azizad 1K » Wed Oct 09, 2019 10:42 pm

The largest change in energy occurs when an electron moves from or to n=1. The transitions between n=2 and n=3 and so on are much smaller, which means that less energy is emitted or absorbed. UV light is high energy and the only transition "large" enough involves transitions with n=1.

SGonzales_3L
Posts: 55
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:17 am

Re: HW Question #1A.15

Postby SGonzales_3L » Wed Oct 09, 2019 10:52 pm

Haley Dveirin 4B wrote:Are there any other series like this other than the Lymen series that we need to memorize?


It might be helpful to remember the Balmer series which is a series of spectral lines found in the visible light region of the electromagnetic spectrum.


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