Manipulation of Equations


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JTijerina_4A
Posts: 46
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2019 12:17 am

Manipulation of Equations

Postby JTijerina_4A » Sun Oct 13, 2019 6:04 pm

What is the difference between the equation: E=hcλ^-1 and E=h(c/λ). From what I remember about negative exponents these two equations should be the same, but my answer does not match the correct answer.

charleejohnson1L
Posts: 99
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Manipulation of Equations

Postby charleejohnson1L » Sun Oct 13, 2019 6:25 pm

E= h (c(lambda^-1) and E = (hc) / (lamda) are the same equation. :) A negative exponent, in the simplest terms, just means that it's supposed to be in a denominator. I hope this helps.

Nyari Muchaka_Discussion 4A
Posts: 53
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Manipulation of Equations

Postby Nyari Muchaka_Discussion 4A » Sun Oct 13, 2019 6:27 pm

You should be getting the same answer. Make sure you move the negative exponent to the bottom before calculating because you technically cannot calculate a number to the negative power.

Vivianvelazquez_1J
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Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Manipulation of Equations

Postby Vivianvelazquez_1J » Sun Oct 13, 2019 6:30 pm

From my understanding, The negative exponent would give you E=hc/λ, not E=h(c/λ). I may be wrong but that's what I understood from the negative exponent.

JinwooLee_1F
Posts: 47
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Manipulation of Equations

Postby JinwooLee_1F » Sun Oct 13, 2019 6:31 pm

They are the same equation, I think when putting them in the calculator you should put parenthesis around the exponent and lambda, see if that makes a difference.

pmokh14B
Posts: 107
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Manipulation of Equations

Postby pmokh14B » Sun Oct 13, 2019 6:31 pm

the -1 exponent just means the lambda is in the denominator.

Gabriel Ordonez 2K
Posts: 113
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Manipulation of Equations

Postby Gabriel Ordonez 2K » Sun Oct 13, 2019 7:27 pm

The above question is not different; the notation is just slightly varied for convenience. The power to the -1 allows chemists to keep equation answers on one line and make the visuals much more simplistic. This notation means the same as dropping that specific number value or variable to the denominator for dividing purposes. I actually use the -1 power in my answers because it keeps my answers visually easier to read.


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