HW 1.7A


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Adriana_Bustamante_3L
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HW 1.7A

Postby Adriana_Bustamante_3L » Tue Sep 29, 2015 7:17 pm

The question in the book asks: The frequency of violet light is 7.1x10^14Hz. What is the wavelength (in nanometers) of the violet light? So here's what I did: I used the equation λ = c / ν to find wavelength in meters which was 4.2x10^-7 . I'm having trouble converting to nanometers. Where the solutions guide is getting 420nm, I am getting 4.23x10^-15nm (From multiplying the found wavelength by 10^-9) . What am I doing wrong?

Chem_Mod
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Re: HW 1.7A

Postby Chem_Mod » Tue Sep 29, 2015 8:38 pm

Nano means one billionth i.e. 10^-9 so 1 nanometer is a billionth of a meter. To convert meters to nanometers, you should multiply by 10^9 instead of divide.

Michelle Nwufo 2G
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Re: HW 1.7A

Postby Michelle Nwufo 2G » Sat Oct 13, 2018 9:48 pm

Chem_Mod wrote:Nano means one billionth i.e. 10^-9 so 1 nanometer is a billionth of a meter. To convert meters to nanometers, you should multiply by 10^9 instead of divide.


Do u mean divide, instead of multiply because I think they originally multiplied and got the wrong answer. I divided, but I’m not sure if I did the problem correctly.

Jeannine 1I
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Re: HW 1.7A

Postby Jeannine 1I » Sat Oct 13, 2018 10:14 pm

I got the same answer of 4.23 x 10^-7, and since nanometers is in 10^-9, I just moved over the decimal so that it would be 10^-9. The answer then becomes 423 x 10^-9, which is the same thing as 423 nanometers. I hope this helps!(:


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