energy level transfer


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claire ikemiya_2I
Posts: 74
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:50 pm

energy level transfer

Postby claire ikemiya_2I » Sun Oct 18, 2020 7:16 pm

Can someone please explain the relationship "AS n --> infinity, E--> 0"

IanWheeler3F
Posts: 61
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:49 pm

Re: energy level transfer

Postby IanWheeler3F » Sun Oct 18, 2020 7:25 pm

what i understood was the energy given off going between any two n levels is E = -(hR)/(n^2) so as you change n levels near infinity you don't really change and distance and when you don't move you don't do work so the energy change is 0. Honestly I'm not 100% clear on it either since I don't fully understand the negative, someone pls help us

Eva Becker
Posts: 54
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:40 pm

Re: energy level transfer

Postby Eva Becker » Sun Oct 18, 2020 7:32 pm

I think it's because as n-->infinity, E becomes so small it approaches 0 (E-->0). When we look at the equation E=-(hR)/(n^2), we can see that as n were to increase and get so large (infinity), E would be equal to a fraction so small it would, in theory, approach 0. I think?

Serena Song 1A
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:53 pm
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: energy level transfer

Postby Serena Song 1A » Sun Oct 18, 2020 7:39 pm

I think based off the equation E=-(hR)/n^2, E and n have an inverse relationship (As n increases, E will decrease. As n decreases, E will increase). So as n gets larger and larger and eventually approaches infinity, E will get smaller and smaller to the point where it is so minuscule, that it's approaching 0.

Manseej Khatri 2B
Posts: 76
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:42 pm

Re: energy level transfer

Postby Manseej Khatri 2B » Sun Oct 18, 2020 9:38 pm

I believe they took the limit of the equation E = -(hR)/n^2 as n approaches infinity. As n gets larger and larger, -(hR)/n^2 gets closer and closer to 0, meaning E gets closer and closer to 0.

Jaden Kwon 3C
Posts: 84
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:49 pm

Re: energy level transfer

Postby Jaden Kwon 3C » Sun Oct 18, 2020 10:15 pm

From a mathematical standpoint, the limit of the function as n approaches infinity is 0 because as the denominator of the function gets closer and closer to infinity, you get closer and closer to 0. From a conceptual standpoint I think energy approaches 0 as n goes to infinity because the energy levels get closer together as n goes to infinity which means less energy is absorbed/emitted.

Adrienne Chan 1G
Posts: 87
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:40 pm

Re: energy level transfer

Postby Adrienne Chan 1G » Sun Oct 18, 2020 11:45 pm

When the electron is freed, its energy is at its maximum and its given as 0. And then for the energy level, the closer the electron is to the atom, the more it will be bound. So when the electron is free, the energy level can be said to be infinite because it's not bound to the atom at all.

Izamary Marquez 2H
Posts: 92
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:44 pm

Re: energy level transfer

Postby Izamary Marquez 2H » Sun Oct 18, 2020 11:49 pm

In lecture, Lavelle mentioned once the energy of e- on the second energy level matches that of the first, the electron is excited. However, I was under the impression that one energy level had to be completely full before e- proceeded to the next energy level. Can someone explain what he meant by this?


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