Properties of Light


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Lusin_Yengibaryan_3B
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Properties of Light

Postby Lusin_Yengibaryan_3B » Mon Oct 19, 2020 1:52 pm

Is c=hv describing the photoelectric effect or some other experiment?

Kimiya Aframian IB
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Re: Properties of Light

Postby Kimiya Aframian IB » Mon Oct 19, 2020 1:58 pm

Lusin_Yengibaryan_2A wrote:Is c=hv describing the photoelectric effect or some other experiment?

Hi! I don't think that "c=hv" is an equation because the original would be "E=hv", but "E (energy)" and "c (speed of light)" are not the equivalent (you can see that with their respective units). The relationship between "c" and "v" is that "c=lamda*v"
Hope this helps!

Ria Nawathe 1C
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Re: Properties of Light

Postby Ria Nawathe 1C » Mon Oct 19, 2020 2:03 pm

As the previous answer stated, the equation is E = hv. The photoelectric effect demonstrated that light exhibits properties of particles and also demonstrated the relationship between energy and frequency of photons.

Akash J 1J
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Re: Properties of Light

Postby Akash J 1J » Mon Oct 19, 2020 2:05 pm

I don't think c=hv is a valid equivalency. However, I think you may have mixed up the two equivalencies "c = wavelength x freq" and "E = h x freq".

Neither of these equations directly describes the photoelectric effect, but they do create easy ways to convert between units.
c = wavelength x freq is useful for converting between wavelength and frequency and E = h x freq is useful for converting between energy in Joules to frequency in Hz.

Malakai Espinosa 3E
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Re: Properties of Light

Postby Malakai Espinosa 3E » Mon Oct 19, 2020 2:21 pm

Like all the previous posts said, the equation would be E=hv. This equation does not directly describe the photoelectric effect, but is merely a component in explaining the experiment. E=hv actually describes the energy of a photon, which we can then use along with the work function to show the photoelectric effect.

Lusin_Yengibaryan_3B
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Re: Properties of Light

Postby Lusin_Yengibaryan_3B » Mon Oct 19, 2020 7:23 pm

Yes, I meant c=lamda * v, but I thought h looked the closest to lamda since I couldn't type lamda on my keyboard.


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